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    Mississippi University for Women
   
 
  Dec 16, 2017
 
 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

9. Colleges and Departments


9.1 College of Arts and Sciences

Brian Anderson, Dean

Purpose Statement

The purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences is to provide quality classroom instruction, practical learning experiences, and academic and cultural enrichment opportunities that will lead to successful student learning. Through the programs in its seven departments, the College provides students with a focused course of study that will prepare them for graduate or professional schools or employment. The College also provides students with a solid educational foundation in the liberal arts that will prepare them for continued personal and intellectual growth after graduation.

Programs

The College of Arts and Sciences offers academic programs through the departments of Art and Design; Communication; History, Political Science, and Geography; Languages, Literature, and Philosophy; Music; Sciences and Mathematics; and Theatre. Additionally, the College offers minors or courses in American Studies, Film Studies, French, International Studies, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Philosophy, Geography, Religious Studies, and Women’s Studies, as well as certificate programs in Teaching English as a Second Language, Public Administration, and Applied and Professional Ethics. For students interested in going to professional schools after MUW, academic advisors help students select the appropriate courses to meet application requirements for medical or dental schools, pharmacy or veterinary medicine programs, law or other professional schools.

Department of Art and Design

Department Chair: Shawn Dickey

Faculty

Professors: Shawn Dickey, Robert Gibson, Beverly Joyce
Associate Professor: Alex Stelioes-Wills
Assistant Professors: Ian Childers, Jonathan Cumberland, Gillian Furniss

Accreditation

Mississippi University for Women is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The B.F.A. in Art Education program is also approved by the Mississippi State Department of Education and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), thereby enabling graduates to satisfy the certification requirements for the State of Mississippi in Art Education.  Art Education graduates are licensed to teach grades K-12.

General Program Information

The Department of Art and Design offers the following baccalaureate degrees: Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art (BFA), and Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education (BFA). Students in the BFA program in Studio Art complete course requirements in one of the following emphases: Drawing and Painting; Graphic Design; Printmaking; Ceramics; or Photography. The BFA degree is a more intensive degree in art and design and is intended for professional practice. 

The Department of Art and Design also offers minors in Art History and Studio Art, open only to non-art majors.

Exhibition Requirements:

All freshman, sophomore, and junior art students in any art major are required to enter artwork in the Annual MUW Juried Student Exhibition. In their senior year, all art majors must participate in a final Senior Exhibition. 

Art Core Requirements:

All art students must complete the Art Core  . Note: Some courses taken for the major may also fulfill requirements for the University core curriculum.

Programs

Department of Communication

Department Chair: Barry P. Smith

Communication Faculty

Associate Professors: Van T. Roberts, Barry P. Smith
Assistant Professor:  Melissa M. Smith
Instructor: Eric E. Harlan

Programs

Department of History, Political Science, and Geography

Interim Department Chair: Bridget Smith Pieschel

Geography Faculty

Visiting Assistant Professor: Ann Fletchall Frazier

History Faculty

Professor: Thomas Velek
Associate Professor: Erin Kempker
Assistant Professors: Amber Handy, Jonathon Hooks
Visiting Assistant Professor: Kristi DiClemente
University Archivist: Derek Webb
 

Political Science Faculty

Professors: Brian Anderson, James Borsig, James D. Ward

Programs

Department of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

Department Chair: Bridget Smith Pieschel

English Faculty

Professors: Gloria Lee Bunnell, Kendall Dunkelberg, Amy Pardo, Bridget Smith Pieschel, Thomas C. Richardson, Leslie Stratyner
Associate Professors: Nora Corrigan, Michael Smith, Kim Whitehead
Instructors: Todd Bunnell, Janet Woodcock

Foreign Languages Faculty

Instructor: Erinn Holloway,Lynn Healy, Robert Raymond

Philosophy Faculty

Professors: Bryan Hilliard
Assistant Professor: Jeffrey Courtright

Programs

Department of Music

Department Chair:  Julia Mortyakova

Music Faculty

Professor: Richard Montalto
Associate Professors: Carmen Osburn
Assistant Professors: Julia Mortyakova, Valentin Bogdan, Phillip Stockton
Visiting Assistant Professor: Cherry Dunn
Visiting Instructor of Music: Elizabeth Jones

Music Programs

Accreditation

Mississippi University for Women is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) for the Bachelor of Arts in Music, the Bachelor of Music in Music Education, and the Bachelor of Music in Music Therapy. The B.M. in Music Education program is approved by the Mississippi State Department of Education and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, thereby enabling graduates to satisfy the certification requirements for the State of Mississippi in Music Education. The Music Therapy program is approved by the American Music Therapy Association.

Programs

Department of Sciences and Mathematics

Department Chair: Dionne Fortenberry

Associate Chair:  Bonnie Oppenheimer

Biological Sciences Faculty

Professors: Lauren Brandon, Paul Mack, George V. Pinchuk, Nicole Welch, Ross Whitwam
Associate Professors: Ghanshyam Heda
Instructors: Thomas Dodson, Bianca Simmons-Diez

Mathematics Faculty

Professors: Dorothy A. Kerzel, Bonnie Oppenheimer
Associate Professor: Joshua Hanes
Assistant Professors: Agnes Carino, Susan Ficken

Physical Sciences Faculty

Professor: Dionne Fortenberry, Jiben Roy
Associate Professor: Xiaoxia Li
Instructor: Edward Bruster

The Department of Sciences and Mathematics offers majors in the areas of Biology, Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physical Science.

Before a student is allowed to register for upper-level courses (those numbered 300 or above) within the department, the student must:

  • Have a 2.0 average for all courses taken within the department (including transfer credit)
  • Have completed all prerequisites for upper-level courses with grades of C or better

Exceptions to any of the above requirements require approval of the Chair of the Department of Sciences and Mathematics.

Prerequisite Courses for Professional Programs

For students interested in health-related professional schools, a B.S. degree (typically a biology or chemistry major) at the W allows the students to tailor their course selection to ensure all requirements are met for the professional school of their choice. Such professional schools include: Medical, Pharmacy, Veterinary, Dental, and Optometry.

Engineering Dual-Degree Program

The Department of Sciences and Mathematics has joined with the School of Engineering at Auburn University and the College of Engineering at Mississippi State University in offering a Dual-Degree program in Liberal Arts and Engineering. In this program, a student attends MUW for three years and one of the other institutions for at least two additional years. After completing the academic requirements of both cooperating universities, the student will be awarded a baccalaureate degree from MUW and one of several designated engineering baccalaureate degrees from the second institution.

Programs

Department of Theatre

Department Chair: David Carter

Theatre Faculty

Professor: William Biddy
Associate Professor: David Carter
Assistant Professor: Lee Crouse

Programs

9.2 College of Business and Professional Studies 

Scott Tollison, Dean

Department of Business

Department Chair:  Martha A. Brock

Business Faculty

Professors: Kimberly Dorsey, Dee Anne Larson, C. Scott Tollison
Associate Professor:  Martha A. Brock, Andrew Luccasen
Instructors: Hugh Cooper, Elaine Evans, Thomas Haffey, John Williams

Purpose Statement for Department of Business 

The purpose of the Department of Business at Mississippi University for Women is to provide quality undergraduate business programs in Business Administration and Accounting for local, regional, national, and international students. Through small class sizes and the implementation of current technologies, the qualified faculty and staff strive to graduate highly qualified and competent individuals who have developed critical thinking skills, leadership and technical skills, high ethical standards, and an awareness and understanding of national and global business issues, cultural diversity, and women’s issues. The Department of Business supports the Mississippi University for Women’s mission of delivering high-quality instruction designed to assist students in attaining their academic, professional, and personal goals.

Business Majors

Mississippi University for Women, through its Department of Business, is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) to offer the following business degrees:

The Bachelor of Science in Accounting

The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with concentrations in General Business, Management, Management Information Systems, and Marketing

The department also offers the following degrees:

          The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with concentrations in Health Care Management and
          Human Resource Management

Bachelor of Technology in Professional Studies, with concentrations in General Business, Health Care Management, Human Resource Management, Legal Administration, and Management Information Systems

Business Minors

Certain prerequisite courses are required for junior and senior level courses in the Business Minors. Refer to the course descriptions for required prerequisites. A grade of C or higher must be earned in each required course in the minor, including the prerequisites.

Field Experience (Internship)

Business majors may elect to complete an approved, faculty-supervised internship (BU 400). To be eligible, students must be classified as juniors or seniors in their majors and must possess a 2.5 or higher overall grade point average. During the enrollment  semester, students must complete a minimum of 120 hours of on-site work experience. Students may or may not be compensated for their internship experience. Additional internship requirements include an academic research component and an acceptable evaluation by the internship supervisor. Business majors may earn up to 6 credit hours of internship credit with advisor approval.

Programs

Department of Legal Studies

Director:  Wesley Garrett

Legal Studies Faculty

Professor:  David Smith
Associate Professor:  Wesley Garrett
Assistant Professor:  Elizabeth A. Chisolm
 

Legal Studies

The objectives of the Legal Studies are as follows:

  1. To train students as paralegals to assist attorneys in law offices, legal services corporations, banks, corporations, and various government agencies by providing instruction and experience in general education, business, and law.
  2. To provide students with a basic understanding of legal concepts and terms of subjects which are vital to practicing paralegals. To provide students with legal writing and research skills to enable graduates to perform as efficient members of a legal team.
  3. To support the general principles of ethical legal practices and professional responsibilities and to support the prohibitions against the unauthorized practice of law by lay persons.
  4. To provide knowledge of the principles of ethical and professional responsibilities as these relate to lawyers, legal assistants, and clients and to the legal profession.
  5. To provide a broad background in general education for the development of a well rounded individual.
  6. To constantly improve and adjust the program to meet the needs of the community by seeking input from judges, local attorneys, legal assistants, and students.
  7. To maintain equality of opportunity in the education program without discrimination on the grounds of race, color, religion, natural origin, or gender.

Programs

Culinary Arts Institute

Interim Associate Director: Amanda A. Dahl

Culinary Arts Institute Faculty

Assistant Professor: Jessica Henry
Chef Instructor: Carol Dowdy, Alexei Harrison, Mary Hawkins, Amanda Thacker
Instructor: Amanda A. Dahl

Purpose Statement

The purpose of the MUW Culinary Arts Institute, established in 1996, is to provide interdisciplinary instruction in culinary arts in order to prepare students for employment and leadership in diverse areas of the food industry. The Culinary Arts Institute supports the University’s mission by providing instruction in a highly interactive environment through which students develop skills in communication, technology, and critical thinking in addition to fundamental culinary skills. The Culinary Arts Institute further supports the University’s mission by offering students a broad perspective on their chosen profession and encouraging leadership and learning activities outside the traditional classroom setting.

The MUW Culinary Arts Institute offers the following:

  1. a Bachelor of Science Degree in Culinary Arts;
  2. an emphasis in one of five correlate areas-culinary entrepreneurship; food journalism; food art (food styling and photography); nutrition and health; Culinology®
  3. a Bachelor of Science Degree in Culinology®
  4. a Bachelor of Technology in Professional Studies with a concentration in Culinary Arts
  5. a minor in Culinary Arts or Nutrition and Health

Internship Opportunities

Students majoring in culinary arts are required to complete a 6 or 12 credit-hour internship following their junior year. Internship opportunities are offered in locations throughout the U.S. or internationally and include, but are not limited to, hotels and restaurants, catering services, bed and breakfast operations, publishing firms, and food manufacturers. Sites and assignments are based on the individual student’s professional interests and abilities.

Programs

9.3 College of Education and Human Sciences

Martin Hatton, Interim Dean

Purpose Statement

The College of Education and Human Sciences offers quality undergraduate programs in teacher education, human sciences, including psychology and family studies, and health & kinesiology, including exercise science, pre-physical therapy, H&K Teacher Certification, and public health. It also offers graduate programs in teacher education, educational leadership and health education. These programs serve one or more of four primary purposes: (1) provide courses necessary for teacher certification or licensure; (2) prepare students to enter graduate or professional schools; (3) serve the needs of the university general core; and (4) provide advanced professional programs. These purposes relate directly to Goal #1 in the university’s strategic plan, which is to “provide high quality instructional programs that are affordable, accessible and student centered.” The college also houses the Child and Parent Development Center.

Department of Education

Department Chair: Monica Riley

Education Faculty

Professors: Twila Alpe, Richard Holden, Sue Jolly-Smith, Linda Mahoney, Monica Riley
Associate Professor: Shelley Bock, Royal Toy
Assistant Professors: April Coleman, Brenda Dickey, Bob Fuller, Chrystal Hodges

The “Educator as Reflective Decision Maker” is the model for the conceptual framework for the educator preparation programs at Mississippi University for Women. The programs have adopted the Core Standards of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards as goals for teacher candidates, and the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders for school administrator candidates. Further explanations of requirements and expectations for undergraduate teacher candidates are in the Teacher Education Handbook published by the Office of Field Experiences, and available through the MUW website.

NCATE (CAEP) Accreditation

The  MUW Educator Preparation Unit and all programs in education are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).The MUW teacher certification programs are also approved by the Mississippi Department of Education, which makes graduates of these programs eligible for Mississippi Educator Licensure in the approved areas. The NCATE accrediting body has merged with another accrediting organization (TEAC) to form the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). The accreditation covers both initial and advanced educator preparation programs. Since many states have reciprocity agreements based on graduation from  NCATE/CAEP accredited schools, graduates of NCATE/CAEP accredited institutions will generally find it easier to apply for educator licensure when they move out of state.

Quality Assurance Policy

All teacher education programs are covered by the Mississippi Institution of Higher Learning Quality Assurance Policy. The university warrants the quality of our graduates for a period of two years immediately following graduation. Certain guidelines do apply. Contact the College of Education and Human Sciences for more information.

Admission to Teacher Education

Students seeking admission to Teacher Education must submit documentation of the following to the Office of Field Experiences through a Mississippi University for Women TaskStream Account:

  1. Application for admission to Teacher Education.
  2. Curriculum check sheet and tentative program.
  3. Minimum grade of C in ED 300 .
  4. Overall 2.75 GPA on a minimum of 44 semester hours completed.
  5. Satisfactory score on the Core Academic Skills for Educators (CORE) Subtests (Reading, Writing, and Math) OR minimum ACT scores, composite of 21 with no subscore below 18.
  6. Verification of completed criminal background check through the university approved site.

Guidelines for this submission are reviewed in the course ED 300 - Education as a Profession .

Note to Transfer Students:

Before registering, students transferring to MUW during the junior or senior year who intend to get a teaching license should report to the Department of Education for guidance.

Admission To Teacher Internship

Students must submit applications no later than October 1 for Spring Semester admission or February 15 for Fall Semester admission.

Following admission to Teacher Education, a student must complete a minimum of one semester of coursework before being admitted to Teacher Internship. Materials for application to (teacher internship) will be distributed at a required orientation seminar at the beginning of each semester. Students seeking admission to Teacher Internship must submit documentation of the following to the Director of Field Experiences, College of Education and Human Sciences:

  1. Admission to Teacher Education at least one semester prior to filing application for admission to Student Teaching.
  2. Application form for Teacher Internship.
  3. Verification of experience with school age children and/or youth (75 hours).
  4. Passing scores on Praxis II: Principles of Learning & Teaching, and Specialty Area Test.
  5. Ethics statement/insurance verification and release.
  6. Health information and profile.
  7. Teaching Center request for placement form.
  8. Completion of 84 semester hours of credit (to include all required professional education courses).
  9. Minimum grade of C in each of the following: EN 101  and EN 300  (EN 102  if transferred prior to first semester of attendance at MUW); COM 101 ; MA 113  or higher (excluding MA 123 ); MA 111  and MA 112  all professional education courses and all endorsement area courses.
  10. Overall GPA of 2.75 and overall MUW GPA of 2.75.

Professional Field Experiences

Students in teacher education will be required to complete field-based assignments which are designed as a part of each methods course. Students in teacher education curricula should plan their schedules to allow approximately two to five hours per week in related field activities. These field experiences are assigned and coordinated through the Office of Field Experiences in the Department of Education. Students in field experiences will be required to complete a criminal background check through the MUW Office of Field Experiences.

Students admitted to the MUW Teacher Education Program will plan their schedules to insure one semester of the senior year for the Professional Semester, which consists of a fourteen-week teacher internship experience in the schools. The student will also enroll in ED 401 , Classroom Management, for which an additional three semester hours credit will be earned. The program of the Professional Semester will be followed without deviation. No regular college course, other than ED 401 , may be taken for credit during the Professional Semester, except with the approval of the Admissions/Exceptions Committee for Teacher Education.

Students majoring in elementary education need to plan their schedules so that they can take all their methods courses as a block during the semester preceding teacher internship.

Recommendation For Licensure

The student will be eligible for the recommendation by the institution for a Mississippi Educator’s license on completion of all degree requirements and approved teacher education program requirements, to include a minimum grade of C in Teacher Internship taken in the professional semester. Students must have an official copy of their scores on the Praxis Series forwarded to both the Mississippi Department of Education, Office of Educator Licensure and the College of Education and Human Sciences, Mississippi University for Women.

Notice Regarding Licensure

Requirements governing licensure in the State of Mississippi are continually revised. As a result, requirements for degrees leading to licensure are subject to change from those published in this Bulletin. The student is advised to refer to the current online version of the Teacher Education Handbook and the Mississippi Department of Education office of Educator Licensure to insure that both degree requirements and license requirements are met.

Teacher Education Curricula

All students preparing to teach should follow the appropriate program in the next section. This includes Elementary Education; Special Subject Area-Grades K-12 (Art, Music, Physical Education, Spanish and Theatre) and the various subject areas of Secondary Education-Grades 7-12 (Chemistry/Physical Science; English; Biology; Mathematics; Social Studies). A minimum grade of C is required in each Education course, in EN 101 - English Composition I  and EN 102 - English Composition II , MA 111 - Modern Elementary Mathematics I  and MA 112 - Modern Elementary Mathematics II  (for elementary education majors), MA 113 - College Algebra , COM 101 - Oral Communication , and in each endorsement area course. See academic advisor for program planning.

Programs

Department of Health and Kinesiology

Department Chair: Mark Bean

Health and Kinesiology Faculty

Professor: Mark Bean
Associate Professors:  K. Randell Foxworth, Irene T. Pintado
Assistant Professors: Chad Murphy, Caroline Payne-Purvis
Instructor: Katie Cranston

Programs

Department of Psychology and Family Studies

Department Chair: Holleen Krogh

Psychology Faculty

Professors: Holleen R. Krogh, James D. Roth
Assistant Professor: Mallory L. Malkin
Emeriti Faculty:  Richard Millikin

Family Studies Faculty

Associate Professors:  Dorothy Berglund, Youn Mi Lee

Accreditation

Mississippi University for Women’s Family Studies major is approved by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE) program. Students graduating from this program can apply for provisional certification through an abbreviated process.

Programs

Graduate Studies in Education

Program Purpose:

The Graduate Programs in Education provide high quality, advanced professional development and leadership training for educators, which will strengthen their theoretical knowledge, their practice, and increase their accountability for student learning. This reflects the University’s mission of professional education with an emphasis on academic and leadership preparation.

The conceptual framework for graduate programs in education is based on the five core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The related belief statements that follow each core proposition further characterize the advanced programs in education.  The program in Educational Leadership is aligned with the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards.

The Graduate Programs in Education are: Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Education in Gifted Studies, Master of Education in Differentiated Instruction, Master of Education in Reading/Literacy, and Master of Education in Educational Leadership.

Progression in the Program

  1. The potential Graduate student must make formal application for admission, providing transcripts of all undergraduate work, GRE scores, 3 letters of recommendation, proof of immunization and $25.00 application fee (MAT applicants must submit passing scores on the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators OR ACT scores of 21 or above with no subscore less than an 18 AND Praxis II, content area.). 
  2. The Graduate student, in consultation with his/her advisor, works out a proposed program of study.
  3. After completion of 9 semester hours with a minimum 3.0 QPA, the student who has been admitted conditionally must meet with his/her advisor to determine whether the student’s admission status can be upgraded.
  4. The Graduate student must meet with his/her advisor prior to registration to secure approval for courses to be taken in the ensuing semester.
  5. The Graduate student must submit an official transcript of any transfer credits before his/ her last semester of course work. No more than 6 hours with minimum grade of B may be transferred.
  6. Withdrawal from a graduate class should be done in consultation with an advisor and must be approved by the College Dean.
  7. When a graduate student has completed at least 9 hours of degree requirements with an overall QPA of 3.0 (including no more than 6 hours with a grade of C), the Candidacy Form should be completed and submitted for approval.
  8. All requests for modification of the Candidacy Form must be made in writing to the Program Coordinator whose approval allows the student to proceed with courses as planned.
  9. A minimum of 15 semester hours must be completed following the student’s admission to candidacy.
  10. Before graduation all graduate students will submit a professional portfolio to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs in Education. For August graduates, portfolios are due the first day of the second summer session and will be returned by the last day of the same session. For May and December graduates, portfolios are due one month prior to graduation. Students are advised to keep a copy of all contents for their own records.
  11. To take the Comprehensive Examination, the student must submit a written request to the Coordinator of Graduate Programs in Education at the beginning of his/her last semester.
  12. The Comprehensive Examination will be given in Room 211, Education/HS Building, 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Exams are usually scheduled for the last Saturday in April, the third Saturday in June, and the first Saturday in December. Please confirm date, time, location, and other pertinent information in advance of the exam. 
  13. The Graduate student needs to meet with his/her advisor to confirm completion of graduation requirements: all admission and program requirements have been satisfied, all transcripts of transfer credit have been submitted to and processed by the registrar, the comprehensive examinations have been complete satisfactorily, the overall QPA is at least a 3.0, and no Incompletes remain on the student’s academic record.

9.4 College of Nursing and Speech Language Pathology

Sheila V. Adams, Dean

Mission Statement

The mission of the College of Nursing and Speech-Language Pathology is reflected in the mission, philosophies and outcomes of each program. The college provides high quality undergraduate and graduate professional programs in nursing and speech-language pathology. Classes are small, emphasizing a personalized learning environment that prepares graduates for competitive professional careers or graduate school. This mission is directly related to the University’s mission to provide high quality undergraduate and graduate education in a variety of liberal arts and professional programs.

Nursing Programs (Associate, Baccalaureate, Masters and Doctoral)

Mission Statement

The mission of the Nursing programs is to provide education that prepares nurses for several levels of practice. Preparation is offered at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels in a personalized and stimulating environment conducive to strong academic and leadership preparation, community service, achievement of clinical expertise, and life-long learning. As a part of the educational process, students develop an awareness of gender-related issues and multicultural diversity. The mission relates to the Mission of the University by providing professional education for several levels of students with an emphasis on academic and leadership preparation for women and men in a personalized environment. The mission, philosophies, and outcomes of the department and the programs are consonant with the mission and aims of the University and are derived from the faculty’s beliefs about the nature of education and nursing practice. (Information on the Master of Science in Nursing and Doctorate of Nursing Practice Programs may be found in The W Graduate Bulletin). Information on comparison of expenses and fees with other Mississippi Nursing Schools can be found in Nursing Education Opportunities in Mississippi at the web site http://www.mshealthcareers.com/news/nursingopp.htm.

Accreditation

The Associate of Science in Nursing, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and the Master of Science in Nursing Programs all hold state accreditation from the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL, 3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211; 601-432-6486, http://www.ihl.state.ms.us. The Associate of Science in Nursing Program also is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. (ACEN, 3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. 404-975-5000, or via the web at http://www.acenursing,org). The Bachelor and Master of Science in Nursing Programs also are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC, 20036-1120. 1-404-975-5000, or via the web at www.aacn.nche.edu/accreditation). Doctorate of Nursing Practice Program has initial state accreditation and is currently seeking accreditation by the  Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Facilities

The general education and nursing courses for the ASN Program, the Generic BSN Program, the MSN Program and DNP Program are taught on the main campus of Mississippi University for Women. Nursing courses for the BSN Advanced Placement Option are taught from the Advanced Education Center on the Tupelo campus. Facilities utilized for undergraduate clinical nursing experiences include institutions and agencies usually within a sixty-five mile radius. Students are not guaranteed an assignment in any one clinical area.

Advanced Placement Options

Licensed Practical Nurses with a current unencumbered Mississippi LPN license and at least one year’s work experience in a clinical setting within the last two (2) years are eligible for advanced placement in the Associate of Science in Nursing Program. They must have satisfactorily completed the prerequisite courses, first year non-nursing courses, NU 112 - Pharmacology and Drug Therapy in Nursing , NU 144 - Nursing Transition , and NU 145 - Nursing Transition Clinical . NU 112 , NU 144 , and NU 145  are offered during the second term of summer school. Upon completion of NU 144  and NU 145  the LPN will have validated 16 hours of credit in nursing and may enter the second year of the Associate of Science in Nursing curriculum. Sixty (60) semester credit hours are required for graduation. Thirty (30) hours must be earned at MUW.

Registered Nurses who are graduates of Associate of Science in Nursing and Diploma Programs with a current unencumbered license are eligible for advanced placement in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program when they have satisfactorily completed all but 12 hours of the prerequisite courses. The professional transition course sequence NU 360 , NU 361 , NU 362 , and NU 363 , is offered in the fall semester. Upon completion of this sequence, the RN will have validated 24 hours of credit in nursing and would then enter the senior year.

Dual Enrollment RN to BSN Option: The BSN Program has begun to offer a Dual Enrollment Option for students enrolled in ADN programs. 

RN to BSN Dual Enrollment Option students will not be admitted to the W’s RN to BSN Advanced Placement Option but will be allowed to take the first semester junior level courses in the specified sequence if they meet the Dual Enrollment Option requirements. Dual Enrollment Option students must meet the RN to BSN Advanced Placement Option admission requirements with regard to prerequisite hours (a minimum of 50 hours completed), 2.5 grade point average (GPA of 3.0 required if ACT is less than 21), and ACT. ONLY the RN Licensure requirement will be waived. Dual Enrollment Option students will not be admitted to The W’s RN to BSN Advanced Placement Option until they have completed their ADN Program, passed the licensure exam, and provide proof of an unemcumbered Registered Nurse license. At that time, they will be considered for admission to The W’s RN to BSN Advanced Placement Option and if admitted will begin the senior level courses.

Procedures for Advanced Placement Options

  1. Students must complete all requirements for admission to the University and be accepted into the Associate of Science/Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs.
  2. Students seeking advanced placement in the Associate of Science in Nursing Program must complete the prerequisite and first year non-nursing courses.
  3. Students seeking advanced placement in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program may enter after completing 50 hours of BSN prerequisite core course work.
  4. Students seeking advanced placement in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing RN to BSN Dual Enrollment Program may enter after completing 50 hours of BSN prerequisite core course work and completing one semester of ADN coursework and receiving a letter of support from the ADN Program Director.

Transfer of Credit

Equivalent courses that students have taken at an accredited two or four year college will usually be accepted for credit. For students entering the Associate of Science and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program, D grades may be accepted by the University for transfer credit, but are not accepted as passing grades in the Department of Nursing due to state accreditation standards for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program and program requirements for the Associate of Science in Nursing Program. Science courses older than six years will not be accepted unless the applicant can provide information regarding utilization of knowledge in an on the job situation. This will be evaluated on an individual basis. Nursing courses are evaluated on an individual basis. Students transferring from another School of Nursing must provide a letter verifying eligibility for readmission to the nursing program from which they are transferring. If a transfer student has failed a nursing course in another nursing program that will count as the student’s first failure in terms of eligibility for readmission to the nursing program.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

The following apply to all undergraduate nursing programs at MUW.

Attendance

Refer to student handbook and individual course instructor.

Health

All students in clinical nursing courses are required to:

  • provide documentation of having an annual health examination
  • provide documentation of having had two MMRs (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) or proof of serological immunities
  • provide documentation of QuantiFERON TB Gold negative results
  • provide documentation of having a tdap plus TT within the last 5 years unless tdap was within 5 years
  • provide documentation of having had varicella immunity titer or series (2) of immunizations
  • provide documentation of having taken the Hepatitis B Vaccine series (3)
  • present a clear finding (negative results) on the drug/alcohol screen
  • present a clear criminal background check letter

All students admitted to the Department of Nursing are subject to the Department of Nursing Drug and Alcohol Abuse Policy and to any clinical agencies’ drug policy.

Insurance

All students in clinical nursing courses must provide proof of automobile, major medical, and malpractice insurance.

Transportation

Students are responsible for providing and paying for their own transportation for clinical and field experiences.

Other

All students in clinical nursing courses must have current American Heart CPR certification, and instruction in OSHA requirements related to universal precautions and HIPAA guidelines. All students are required to have a criminal background check in accordance with Mississippi Statue 43-11-13 regarding health care workers. If a student has any felonies or disqualifying events, he/she will be subject to exclusion from the Department of Nursing. All applicants submit to a criminal background check by the MUW Police Department and a drug/alcohol screen prior to entering or returning to the program. Failure by an applicant to indicate suitability on the background check or to present a clear finding (negative results) on the drug/alcohol screen will result in prohibition from entering (exclusion from) the nursing program.

After admission to the nursing program, students must report any arrests or disqualifying events that occur after their initial criminal background check.  The student must report such events to the appropriate nursing department chair (ASN, BSN, MSN and DNP).  Failure to report is grounds for dismissal from the nursing program.

In order to successfully complete the nursing program, all nursing students must be able to successfully demonstrate the knowledge and skills required of a nursing student as described in the Knowledge and Skills Required of a Nursing Student which is listed under “Admission Plans-Nursing Programs” in this Undergraduate Bulletin. If a student is not able to meet these standards, he/she may initiate a meeting with the Student Success Center for review of his/her case to see if reasonable accommodations are possible as per the normal university procedures. If reasonable accommodations are made and the student continues to be unable to meet one or more of the standards, the student will not be able to successfully complete the requirements of the program.

Department of Associate Nursing

Department Chair: Maria Stephens

Associate of Nursing Faculty

Professor: Karen Nabors
Associate Professors: Brandy Larmon, Clara Rustin, Maria Stephens
Assistant Professor: Mary Helen Ruffin
Instructors: Tammy Bolton, Barbara Bryan, Allison Caston, Adrian Sligh, Pam Thomas

Mission Statement

The mission of the Associate of Science in Nursing Program is to prepare nurses to provide care to patients in the community with acute and chronic health care needs where policies and procedures reflect current nursing standards of care and practices. This mission relates to the Mission of the University by providing general and specialized education for a diverse population of students, but with an emphasis on career preparation for women. The Associate of Science in Nursing Program functions within the College of Nursing and Speech-Language Pathology and the Department of Nursing to provide education which is facilitated by a personalized environment for entry level into professional nursing practice. This process prepares the graduates to assume responsibilities of a registered nurse as health needs change and research findings expand.

Philosophy

The Associate of Science in Nursing Program at Mississippi University for Women is cognizant of global health care needs and emphasizes the health needs of rural Mississippi. The program combines general and specialized education for a diverse population of students, but with an emphasis on career preparation for women. The program for the associate degree nurse prepares the graduate for entry level into professional nursing practice, which neither requires nor precludes further education.

The faculty believe that each person is a biological, psycho-social, cultural, spiritual and intellectual being. This holistic nature is in part unique to the individual and in part shared with all humankind. The person’s nature is basically good or neutral, and the individual strives to satisfy basic needs, as well as to work toward self-actualization. Interaction between the individual and the environment occurs throughout the life span, and follows a sequential, orderly pattern of growth and development. The person is of value to self, family, community and the environment as an individual, regardless of any innate abilities or differences. Therefore the individual has the right to health care opportunities that promote health behaviors, create health environments, and increase access to high quality health care, which can lead toward the realization of the person’s full potential as a human being.

Nursing is one of many professions providing health care to individuals within society as a whole. In its broadest sense, nursing is the application of arts and sciences in assisting the person to maintain and/or recover the optimum level of health or to accept death. Nursing’s functions include the performance of those activities that would ordinarily be performed by the self, if the individual had the strength, will or knowledge. These nursing interventions should be performed in a manner which reduces risk, prevents disease and promotes the patient’s health responsibility, freedom, awareness and dignity as an integral part of society.

Associate degree nursing combines nursing skills with selected principles from the biological, technological, and social sciences. The associate degree nurse utilizes these principles and skills to assess the individual’s level of growth and development and potential assets along the wellness-illness continuum. Therapeutic nursing intervention and instruction are planned and evaluated to assist the person to achieve maximum health or to accept death. The associate degree nurse is prepared to provide care to patients in the community where policies and procedures reflect current nursing standards of care and practice.

Education is a change in individual behavior which evolves from organized learning experiences through the use of critical thinking. It is the process through which a student acquires knowledge, decision-making skills, and understanding of those facts, principles and concepts that underlie a field of endeavor. The student is assisted in integrating the knowledge, communication and psychomotor skills necessary to function effectively in that field of endeavor in a complex, dynamic society.

Learning is a continuous and active process manifested by change reflected in behavior. This learning is best achieved when outcomes of learning are behaviorally defined and attainable through a sequential learning process from the simple to the complex. With recognition of the dependent nature of the student body, the learner is encouraged toward progressive independence. The learning process is facilitated by a personalized environment which re-enforces individual strengths through technological instruction, written communication, oral presentations, individual conferences, small group discussions, and specific planned activities reflecting evidence-based practice.

Associate Degree nursing education is committed to ensuring program effectiveness through strategic planning and collaborative relationships within the community. Through provision of educational opportunities, graduates are prepared to assume the roles of provider of care, manager of care and member of the discipline of nursing in a changing and diverse society. The functions and responsibilities of the associate degree nurse will change as health needs within society change and research findings expand. In preparing for this change and expansion, a learning environment which emphasizes leadership, management, individual accountability, and the need for continued professional and cultural growth is provided.

Student Learning Outcomes

The Associate of Science in Nursing Program prepares individuals to:

  1. Utilize the nursing process and Maslow’s hierarchy in providing patient centered care to an individual or to a group of patients with acute and chronic health care needs.
  2. Demonstrate leadership in order to provide therapeutic nursing intervention, including patient instruction, which reflects critical thinking, nutrition, pharmacology, communication theory, evidence based research findings, and the assessment of patient needs.
  3. Evaluate the interrelatedness between the patient’s needs, family, community and cultural, ethnic, and social environment.
  4. Utilize the patient’s level of growth and development and strengths along the wellness-illness continuum in providing care and instruction.
  5. Provide safe and effective care where policies and procedures reflect current nursing standards of care and practice utilizing quality improvement processes.
  6. Collaborate with interdisciplinary teams in the community in managing patient centered care.
  7. Demonstrate personal accountability within the ethical and legal framework of nursing practice.
  8. Demonstrate the responsibility of maintaining personal, professional, and cultural awareness.
  9. Incorporate technology and informatics to plan, provide, and manage effective patient centered care.
  10. Demonstrate an awareness of the concept of systems-based practice in providing patient centered care.

Admission Policy

See Undergraduate Admissions  in this Bulletin for information concerning admission.

Progression Policy - A.S.N. Program

Once admitted to the A.S.N. Program:

  1. All non-nursing co-requisite courses must be passed with a grade of C or above before proceeding to the next semester. The biological science courses may be repeated only once.
  2. A grade of C or above is required in each required nursing course (NU 112 , NU 114 , NU 115 , NU 116 , NU 124 , NU 125 , NU 126 , NU 144 , NU 145 , NU 214 , NU 215 , NU 216 , NU 224 , NU 225 , NU 228 , NU 235 ). A student who makes a D or lower in any nursing course is automatically excluded from the A.S.N. program and must petition for readmission. A student may be readmitted only once to the A.S.N. program. If only one course component is failed it is considered as one failure. If more than one course is failed concurrently (in the same semester) it is also considered as one failure. A student who fails to make a C or above in any required nursing course, following readmission is permanently excluded from the A.S.N. program and is ineligible for readmission. See readmission policy for exception. 
  3. For each theory nursing course with an accompanying clinical course (NU 114 /NU 115 , NU 124 /NU 125 , NU 144 /NU 145 , NU 214 /NU 215 , NU 224 /NU 225  or NU 235 ) a grade of a C or above is required in the theory course with a grade of C or better in the accompanying clinical course in order to progress. If this does not occur, both the theory and the clinical course must be retaken together. If only one course component (theory or clinical) is failed it is considered as one failure; if both theory and clinical components are failed concurrently it is also considered as one failure.
  4. A WF in a nursing course or in a biological science course is considered as a failure in that course.
  5. A student who fails a nursing course for unsafe practice, unethical or illegal conduct will be dismissed from the program and will not be eligible for readmission to any program in the Department of Nursing.

Readmission Policy-A.S.N. Program

Students may be readmitted to the A.S.N. Program only once. Students who are ineligible to return to the Department of Nursing due to two nursing failures and who have become Licensed Practical Nurses with a current unencumbered Mississippi license and with at least 2 years work experience as an LPN may be considered for a second readmission into the Associate Degree Program.

  1. Students must petition in writing to the A.S.N. Readmission Committee.
  2. The Readmission Committee will meet in February, May, August, and October on a date determined by the committee. Petitions for readmission for the summer and fall semesters must be submitted by the 10th of April. Petitions for readmission for the spring semester must be submitted by the 10th of September.
  3. Students must obtain an MUW and an overall grade point average of 2.5 prior to readmission to the A.S.N. Program.
  4. Students who have been dismissed from the program for unsafe practice, unethical or illegal conduct will be excluded from the A.S.N. Program and will be ineligible for readmission to any program in the Department of Nursing.
  5. Generic students who are ineligible for readmission in the B.S.N. nursing program are ineligible for readmission into the Department of Nursing and therefore ineligible for admission into the A.S.N. program.
  6. The transcript, clinical record and letter of petition for each student will be reviewed by the Readmission Committee. Within three (3) working days after review, the Committee will make recommendations and notify each student. The Readmission Committee chairperson will then inform the department chair of the committee’s recommendations.
  7. If the recommendation of the committee is to readmit the student to the first semester of the generic option or the 2nd summer session  for the advanced placement option the student must compete for a place in the class.  Readmission to the 2nd, 3rd or 4th semesters will be conditional on a space available basis according to the number of faculty and availability of clinical facilities.
  8. Students will be readmitted under requirements of the current Undergraduate Bulletin.
  9. Students petitioning for readmission who have been out of the ASN nursing program for two (2) or more academic years, will be considered for readmission to the ASN program on a case by case basis by the Department Chair.

Programs

Department of Baccalaureate Nursing

Department Chair: Tammie L. McCoy

Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty

Professors: Sheila V. Adams, Linda S. Mills, Tammie McCoy
Assistant Professor: Melisia Henry, Sally Pearson, Cathy Smith, Terry Todd Donna Williams
Instructors: Nan Anderson, Lisa Bailey, Hannah Bascomb, Mike Calvery, Jolyn Cooke, Sacha Dawkins, Clara Hurd, Jessica Jeremiah, Russell King, Lindsay Mitchell, Amy Mobley, Gladys Mooneyham, Leigh Anne Puckett, Debbie Ricks, Tara Sullivan, Dana Walker,
Emeriti Faculty: Linda S. Mills, Janice Giallourakis, Deborah Miranda

Mission

The mission of the Bachelor of Science in  Nursing Program is to prepare a nurse generalist who is a leader in the promotion and maintenance of health and the improvement of health care outcomes across all settings at the local, state, national, and global levels. This mission relates to the mission of the university by providing strong academic and leadership preparation to both women and men. Utilizing AACN’s The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice, and ANA Standards as guiding standards, the graduate is able to function as a provider of care, designer/manager/coordinator of care and a member of the profession. Graduates from the Baccalaureate nursing program are prepared with a liberal arts core which contributes to the acquisition of professional knowledge. In-depth preparation in the application of critical thinking skills, communication skills, knowledge acquisition, and standards of professional nursing practice enables the graduate to become a life-long learner..

Philosophy

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing faculty at Mississippi University for Women are committed to the learning process and to the professional development of students by providing programs of academic excellence. In accordance with the mission/purpose of MUW and the Department of Nursing, the faculty have developed a philosophy based on the concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing.

Person

Person constitutes a biopsychosocial, spiritual system constantly interacting with and adapting to the environment to achieve and maintain a homeodynamic state. Person is valuable, holistic and worthy of respect and concern. Person may be defined as an individual, family, community, or society and has varying capabilities for independently meeting universal needs. These capabilities are dynamically influenced by structures, gender, value systems, culture, and environments. Person is responsible for meeting health needs and has the right to make necessary decisions and to receive professional assistance in achieving health goals.

Environment

Environment includes all conditions, circumstances, and influences encountered by and affecting person. Environment may be intrapersonal, interpersonal, or extra-personal in nature. The intrapersonal environment is concerned with forces or interactive influences contained within the person. The interpersonal environment is concerned with forces or interactive influences between persons. The extra-personal environment is concerned with forces or interacting influences existing outside the person. Environment affects the continuous process of becoming, evolving, and changing. Person and environment are complementary systems so that the relationship between the two is reciprocal. Change in one system elicits response in the other.

Health

Health is defined by person in accordance with gender, culture, values, and capabilities. Health is a constantly changing state and exists on an illness to wellness continuum. Promotion and facilitation of optimal health is developed in collaboration with person, when possible, and is based on resources available to both the person and the nurse.

Nursing

Nursing, as a profession, combines concepts from the sciences and liberal arts into an applied science and a creative art which focuses on health needs. The science of nursing is an organized body of knowledge derived through scientific research and theory development and applied through critical thinking skills. The art of nursing is the creative and caring application of this knowledge. The scope of nursing practice deals with diverse populations and includes dependent, independent, and interdependent functioning of the nurse within primary, secondary, and tertiary settings. The faculty believes that the scope of nursing practice changes as health care continually evolves, thus the professional nurse must possess the core competencies and scientific knowledge to provide care across all health care settings. Ascribing to AACN’s The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and ANA Standards, the professional nurse utilizes core knowledge skills to provide quality and safe patient care.

Teaching/Learning

Learning is considered to be a complex lifelong developmental process involving the interaction of the person with the environment. The teacher and learner share in the challenge of creating an atmosphere which stimulates intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, and individual creativity. The teaching-learning process is augmented when the learner actively participates in defining outcomes and assumes responsibility for achieving these outcomes. The teacher serves as a facilitator, counselor, and resource person.

Curriculum Outcomes

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program is designed to prepare a nurse generalist:

  1. Synthesize knowledge from the humanities, social and natural sciences as a basis for nursing decisions.
  2. Utilize organizational and systems leadership, quality improvement, and safety principles to promote high quality and safe patient care.
  3. Integrate nursing research and evidence-based practice into professional nursing practice.
  4. Utilize information management and patient care technology in professional nursing practice to improve patient care outcomes and create a safe care environment.
  5. Apply knowledge of healthcare policies to professional nursing practice.
  6. Collaborate with healthcare providers and consumers for the improvement of patient health outcomes.
  7. Provide professional nursing care across the lifespan to culturally diverse individuals, families, and communities in a variety of health care settings.
  8. Demonstrates responsibility and accountability for professional nursing values and role development.
  9. Utilize research and theory based knowledge in the roles of provider of care, designer/manager/coordinator of care and member of a profession.

Admission Policy

See Undergraduate Admissions  in this bulletin for information concerning admission.

Progression Policy - B.S.N. Program

Once a student is admitted to the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing:

  1. A grade of C or above is required in each nursing course.
    1. Nursing courses may be repeated only once, See “Readmission Policy”.
    2. The student who fails to make a C on a second attempt of a failed nursing course or fails a subsequent nursing course is permanently excluded from the Generic Option of the Baccalaureate Nursing Program.
  2. A grade of C or above is required in each non-nursing course prior to graduation.
  3. A WF in any course is counted as a failure in that course.
  4. For each nursing course with an accompanying clinical course, a grade of C or above is required in both courses in order to progress. If this does not occur, both the theory and the clinical course must be retaken together. If only one course component (Theory or clinical) was failed it is considered as one failure; if both theory and clinical components are failed concurrently it is also considered as one failure.
  5. Students may be dismissed from the program for unsafe practice, unethical conduct, or illegal conduct. In such cases a student will receive an automatic F in nursing courses affected by the actions.

Readmission Policy - B.S.N. Program (Generic)

  1. Students may be admitted to the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing only once after a nursing course failure. (Multiple course failures in one semester count as one failure.) Students who are ineligible to return to the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing due to two nursing course failures and who have become Registered Nurses may be considered for readmission in the RN/BSN Advanced Placement Option.
  2. If the recommendation of the committee is to readmit the student. This readmission will be conditional on a space available basis according to the number of faculty and availability of clinical facilities. Students eligible for readmission will be ranked and chosen according to their overall GPA, total nursing GPA, and final grade in retention course.
  3. A student who makes a D or lower in a nursing course is automatically excluded from the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing and must:
    1. successfully complete a retention course with a grade of C or better.
    2. petition in writing to the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing Readmission Committee following successful completion of the retention program.
    3. submit to another criminal background check and drug screen with same conditions as upon entry into the program.
  4. The student must have obtained an MUW and an overall grade point average of 2.5 prior to readmission.
  5. Students will be readmitted under requirements of the current bulletin.
  6. Students who have been dismissed for unsafe practice, unethical conduct, or illegal conduct will not be eligible for readmission.

Readmission Policy - B.S.N. Program (Advanced Placement Option)

  1. If the recommendation of the committee is to readmit the student. This readmission will be conditional on a space available basis according to the number of faculty and availability of clinical facilities. Students eligible for readmission will be ranked and chosen according to their overall GPA, total nursing GPA, and final grade in retention course.
  2. A student who makes a D or lower in a nursing course is automatically excluded from the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing and must:
    1. successfully complete a retention course with a grade of C or better.
    2. petition in writing to the Department of Baccalaureate Nursing Readmission Committee following successful completion of the retention program.
    3. submit to another criminal background check and drug screen with same conditions as upon entry into the program.
  3. The student must have obtained an MUW and an overall grade point average of 2.0 prior to readmission.
  4. Students will be readmitted under requirements of the current bulletin.
  5. Students who have been dismissed for unsafe practice, unethical conduct, or illegal conduct will not be eligible for readmission.

Application to Junior Level

The number of students admitted to the nursing program depends upon the available resources. Any student who expects to enroll in the generic nursing option must complete an application for the nursing program. This application will normally be completed during the fall semester of the Sophomore year (November). Please see “Undergraduate Admission ” in this bulletin for additional information on admission to the junior level. Admission decisions for the generic option are made in January and all required documents must be in the BSN program office by 5 pm on January 20th of each year.

General Degree Requirements

  1. A minimum of 128 semester hours earned. 
  2. Satisfaction of University core with a C or better (62 hours).
  3. Satisfaction of Nursing courses with a C or better (66 hours).
  4. Transfer students of regionally accredited community/junior colleges that transfer to MUW will be required to earn at least 50% of the semester hours required for a specific degree at a senior institution (including 25% of the semester hours at MUW) before becoming eligible for any degree.

Programs

Department of Speech-Language Pathology

Department Chair: Joy Townsend, Interim

Speech-Language Pathology Faculty

Professors: Marie Byrne, Michelle Harmon
Assistant Professor: Carrie Smith
Instructors: Donna Burlingame, Lynn M. Hanson, Joy Townsend

Purpose Statement

The purpose of the speech-language pathology undergraduate program is to provide students with a basic understanding of normal and disordered communication as preparation for entrance into graduate school. The program requires majors to have a scientific knowledge base for good decision making skills.

Accreditation

The Master’s education program in Speech-Language Pathology at Mississippi University for Women is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville Maryland 20850. 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

Facilities

The programs are taught in Cromwell Communication Center, the MUW Speech and Hearing Center, and various clinical sites in health care facilities and schools.

Programs

9.5 Ina E. Gordy Honors College

Kim Whitehead, Interim Director

MUW’s Ina E. Gordy Honors College serves the academic needs of honor students. Students who successfully complete the Honors curriculum graduate from the institution with honors in their major area of study. In order to be certified for graduation with departmental honors, students must complete all requirements of the program, including the written and oral presentations of the independent study project.

Required of Centennial and Honors Award recipients and open to other students with strong academic records, the Honors College provides a more intensive and innovative learning experience. The Honors College encourages and nurtures academic community and advanced scholarship and meets the needs of talented and motivated students by offering honors sections of general education requirements, interdisciplinary study, and independent research. Honors students are expected to exhibit excellence not only in their grades but also in their intellectual curiosity.

Admission to Honors

Honors College participation is required of Centennial and Honors Award recipients. Recipients of the Presidential Award (both freshmen and transfers) automatically qualify and only need to contact the Honors College to accept admittance. Other entering freshmen may apply for admission if they have a composite ACT score of 24 or higher (or equivalent on other entrance exams).

After enrolling at MUW or as transfers, students may enter the Honors College on the basis of a GPA of at least 3.50 with 12-30 semester hours of credit and at least 3.70 with 31-60 semester hours of credit. Only transfer students may enter the Honors College after sophomore year. Transfer students with 60 or more transferable hours may enter the Honors College on the basis of a GPA of at least 3.70

Honors Standards

The Honors College expects participants to maintain high GPAs. All honors students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.00; students entering the Independent Study must have at least a 3.30. If a student falls below the required cumulative GPA at the end of a given semester, the Director of the Honors College will put that student on honors probation for one semester. If, by the end of the subsequent semester in which the student is enrolled at MUW, the student does not have the required cumulative GPA, the student will be dismissed from the Honors College. The student will receive written notification from the Director of Honors at the beginning of the probation period and at the time of dismissal.

The Residential Honors Program

The Residential Honors Program (RHP), a division of the Honors College, supplements the Honors curriculum with an innovative living and learning experience for freshman and sophomore honors students. Participants live together in the same residence hall and take Honors classes together and study abroad together in the summer after the sophomore year. These students benefit from the intense faculty-student interaction and from the sense of belonging to a community of scholars. All Centennial and Honors Award award holders are required to participate in the RHP. Other honors students may apply. Spaces in the program are limited. Interested students should contact the Director of the Honors College. 

Honors Curriculum


Four-Year


Required Honors Courses:


  • HO 101 - Honors Forum (4 semesters)
  • One Honors section of Philosophy (non-religion)

  • B.S., B.S.N., and B.A.S. students: 2 Foreign Language Courses (a 2-semester sequence)*

  • B.A. students: 2 courses in Science and/or Mathematics (in addition to the Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirements in the General Education Curriculum)

  • B.F.A. and B.M. students:

    • 2 Foreign Language Courses (a 2-semester sequence)*
    • or
    • 2 courses in Science and/or Mathematics (in addition to the Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirements in the General Education Curriculum)
  • HO 303 - Special Topics Seminar (2 Sections)
  • HO 401 - Independent Study I
  • HO 402 - Independent Study II
  • *International students who are citizens of a country where English is not the first language may fulflll this requirement by meeting MUW’s admission standards for English proficiency.

General Education Honors Courses: (Select 2)


In addition to an Honors section of Philosophy, Honors students must take at least two Honors sections of courses from MUW’s General Education Curriculum. Offerings vary each semester and are listed as Honors (HO) sections in the published course schedule.

With the approval of the Honors Director, students may also substitute a 300- or 400-level course outside the student’s major or minor.

Four-Year Residential


The required courses for students in the Residential Honors Program are the same as the Four-Year with the following exceptions:

  • the number of General Education Honors Courses is increased to 4 (taken together in the living-learning community in the freshman and sophomore years) and is not required to include a section of Philosophy (non-religion)
  • the 2 sections of HO 303  - Special Topics Seminar are offered as part of the Residential Honors Study Abroad experience in the summer after the sophomore year
 

Honors Curriculum, Transfer


60 Hours


Transfer students with at least 60 hours:

  • HO 101 - Honors Forum (1 semester recommended)
  • B.S., B.S.N., and B.A.S. students: 2 Foreign Language Courses (a 2-semester sequence)*

  • B.A. students: 2 courses in Science and/or Mathematics (in addition to the Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirements in the General Education Curriculum)

  • B.F.A and B.M. students:

    • 2 Foreign Language Courses (a 2-semester sequence)*
    • or
    • 2 courses in Science and/or Mathematics (in addition to the Natural Sciences and Mathematics requirements in the General Education Curriculum)
  • HO 303 - Special Topics Seminar
  • HO 401 - Independent Study I
  • HO 402 - Independent Study II
  • * International students who are citizens of a country where English is not the first language may fulfill this requirement by meeting MUW’s admission standards for English proficiency.

Less Than 60 Hours:


Transfer students with fewer than 60 hours must also complete:

  • HO 101 - Honors Forum (2-4 semesters under the guidance of the Honors Director)
  • Two of the following courses:

    • Honors section of a course in MUW’s General Education Curriculum (which vary each semester and are listed as HO sections in the published course schedule)
    • a 300- or 400-level course outside the student’s major or minor
    • a different approved course with the approval of the Honors Director
 

9.6 ROTC Programs

The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (Air Force and Army) are under the administrative and academic supervision of the College of Arts and Sciences at Mississippi State University.

Air Force ROTC

The ROTC program is directed by Lt. Col. Terry Dickensheet, Professor of Aerospace Studies at Mississippi State University.

The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) program in combination with the major degree requirements at MUW earn the graduate a commission as Air Force second lieutenant. The Air Force program requirements include 12 hours of upper division AFROTC courses and a four or six-week summer program. All courses must be taken on the campus of Mississippi State University.

For information on the Air Force ROTC program, students should contact Lt. Col. Dickensheet at AFROTC Detachment 425, Mississippi State University, 202 Middleton Hall, P.O. Box AF, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5537, (662) 325-3810, (afrotc@afrotc.msstate.edu, afrotc.msstate.edu).

Army ROTC

The Director of Army ROTC is Lt. Colonel Marcus Majure, Professor of Military Science at Mississippi State University

Purpose and Objectives

The objective of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps is to develop the student’s understanding of associated professional knowledge, to nurture a sense of personal integrity, responsibility, and honor, and to cultivate an appreciation for the problems of national security.

The total number of ROTC hours allowable as elective credit toward a specific degree varies according to institution and program. Most University programs accept six (6) or more hours of ROTC toward graduation. Contact the MUW registrar for information regarding the maximum allowable credit for ROTC.

The Army ROTC Basic Course introduces first and second year students to the institution and its many career opportunities but does not require commitment to future military service. The Advanced Course, which is designed for third and fourth year students, stresses the knowledge and skill, both military and interpersonal, that is required of commissioned officers in the Active Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard.

For information on the Army ROTC program, students should contact Lt. Colonel Majure at Mississippi State University, Department of Military Science, P.O. Box 5447, Mississippi State, MS 39762, 1-800-811-5013. The web site for the Army ROTC program is armyrotc.msstate.edu.