Jun 02, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

12. Courses


 
  
  •  

    BSB 141 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    Credits: 4

    Lecture - Laboratory

    A study of human anatomy and human physiology including the scientific method, cell theory and cell structure, tissues, the integumentary system, the skeletomuscular system, and the respiratory system.

    Note: This course does not count toward the Biology major or the Biology with Teacher Certification major.

  
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    BSB 142 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 141 .

    A continuation of the study of human anatomy and human physiology begun in BSB 141 . Topics will include the circulatory system, the excretory system, the digestive system and metabolism, the reproductive system, and the nervous system.

    Note: This course does not count toward the Biology major or the Biology with Teacher Certification major.

  
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    BSB 201 - Humans: Origins and Ecology

    Credits: 3

    An introductory course with emphasis on humans as a biological species, human evolution from early primates, and human ecology with considerations of populations, resource depletion, and waste production/pollution.

    Note: May be used by non-science majors as a laboratory science if taken concurrently with BSB 102L .

  
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    BSB 230 - General Genetics

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs) or BSB 141 , BSB 142  

    An introduction to the study of the transmission and expression of genetic information. Studying molecular genetics (replication, mutation, repair, and expression of genetic material) will provide the basis of understanding of Mendelian, cellular, and population genetics. Material will include discussion of historical experiments important to the development of the field and of ethical issues raised by modern genetic technologies. This course will prepare students for more advanced topics, e.g. BSB 332  Cellular and Molecular Biology, BSB 452  Immunology, and BSB 467 /PSC 467  Biochemistry.

  
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    BSB 251 - General Botany

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs)

    A study of the comparative structure, function, and ecology of organisms that have traditionally been treated as members of the Plant Kingdom, including algae, fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Particular attention will be paid to the ecological, economic, and medical importance of the groups studied.

  
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    BSB 255 - Pathophysiology

    Credits: 3

    Lecture only

    Prerequisite: BSB 141  and BSB 142 

    A consideration of the disturbances of normal physiology, the mechanisms producing these disturbances, and the ways in which they are expressed symptomatically.

  
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    BSB 303 - Comparative Anatomy

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs) OR BSB 141 , BSB 142  

    Comparative anatomy of the organ systems of representative vertebrate animals with emphasis on evolutionary trends in structure.

  
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    BSB 304 - Research Methods

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: 8 hours of lab-based science

    Research Methods is a non-specialized course looking at the generalities of how research is carried out, what goes into designing a strong experiment, what can be done to increase the reliability of the results, and how data from research is analyzed.  We will also emphasize critical analysis of individual experiments to determine their strengths and weaknesses.  Because no specialized knowledge of biology will be required, any upper-year student who has taken two semesters of a lab-based introductory science course is welcome to take this course.  The lab portion of this course will involve designing well-controlled non-specialized experiments to test simple, every-day hypotheses.

  
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    BSB 310 - General Ecology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 230 , PSC 111  (w/lab), and PSC 112  (w/lab)

    A study of basic ecological principles and methods, ecosystems, communities, populations, evolutionary ecology, applications to human ecology, and selected current research topics.

    Note: Saturday field trips may be planned.

  
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    BSB 313 - Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Science in the Secondary School

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of methods in the teaching of science in junior and senior high school. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications, such as laboratory preparation and safety, animal care and handling, and teaching and classroom management. Each student will have the opportunity to do some teaching in the general biology laboratories at MUW. Students will also review current reference materials on science teaching, as well as state adopted textbooks in biology.

    Note: Only open to students admitted to Teacher Education. This course is taught concurrently with PS 313 . This course does not count toward fulfillment of the requirements for the Biology major. It is for teacher certification only.

  
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    BSB 322 - Animal Physiology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs) OR BSB 141 , BSB 142  

    An advanced animal physiology lecture and laboratory course that stresses principles and mechanisms of animal function. Emphasis is on the physiology of a wide spectrum of animals, both invertebrate and vertebrate, with attention given to molecular, cellular and organismic levels.

  
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    BSB 330 - Advanced Genetics

    Credits: 4

    Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisite: BSB 230  

    An advanced look at genetics, extending and amplifying some of the concepts introduced in BSB 230  General Genetics.  The genetics topics covered will be determined by the instructor’s areas of expertise, but may include microbial genetics and gene regulation, advanced population genetics, or eukaryotic gene regulation.

  
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    BSB 332 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 230 , PSC 111  (w/lab) Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSC 112  (w/lab)

    A one-semester survey emphasizing various molecular pathways necessary to cell functioning, including protein sorting, cell-signaling, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. This course also highlights selected techniques and tools of molecular biology used in experiments relating to the topics covered.

  
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    BSB 346 - Evolutionary Biology

    Credits: 4

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 -BSB 102  (w/labs), BSB 230 . Recommended: BSB 310  (General Ecology).

    An overview of how evolutionary biology underpins, informs, and impacts all areas of biological thought and research. Course content will integrate evolutionary concepts with four main areas of biological science - genetics, molecular biology, organismal biology, and environmental biology.

  
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    BSB 351 - Plant Physiology and Biotechnology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101  w/lab, BSB 102  w/lab, and PSC 111  w/lab. Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSC 112  w/lab. BSB 251  recommended

    A study of the life processes of green plants and of how plants are used in biotechnological applications as well as  how biotechnology can be used to investigate plant physiology. This course will include topics such as photosynthesis, on every level from the molecular to the ecological; the physiological need for water, minerals, and other necessary nutrients; and the physiology of plant development from seed germination to senescence including response to the environment will be examined.

  
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    BSB 408 - Animal Behavior

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  w/labs OR BSB 141 , BSB 142  

    A comparative study of animal behavior with major emphasis on evolutionary, developmental, physiological, genetic, and ecological aspects of vertebrate and invertebrate animal behavior.

  
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    BSB 452 - Immunology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: BSB 230 . BSB 332  highly recommended.

    A study of modern concepts of host defense mechanisms with emphasis on how immunoglobulins are produced, as well as the processes of cellular immunity.

  
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    BSB 459 - Histology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  w/labs OR BSB 141 , BSB 142  

    A study of the structure, ultra-structure and function of mammalian tissues, cells and organelles, with major emphasis on microscopic work in the laboratory.

  
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    BSB 461 - Protein Misfolding and Human Diseases

    Credits: 4

    Lecture/Lab

    Prerequisite: BSB 230  

    In this course student will learn the basics of protein structure and the rold of protein folding in human health and disease.  Diseases such as cystic fibrosis, Niemann-Pick disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease will be studied as emblematic of protein misfolding disorders.  Students will also learn basic biochemical techniques, and how to detect and distinguish folded from misfolded proteins.

  
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    BSB 467 - Biochemistry

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 102  (w/labs), PSC 211  (w/lab) Prerequisite/Corequisite: PSC 212  (w/lab)

    A one semester survey of biochemistry emphasizing protein biochemistry (protein structure and activity, enzyme kinetics, catalytic and regulatory strategies, metabolic pathways) and introducing physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids as necessary to understand protein form and function.

  
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    BSB 485 - Special Topics in Biology or Microbiology

    Credits: 2-4

    Prerequisite: Junior standing in Biological Sciences and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    In-depth considerations of selected biological topics presented as a formal course or seminar format. A term paper may be required.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit.

  
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    BSB 499 - Independent Study in Biology or Microbiology

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing in Biological Sciences and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair Prerequisite/Corequisite: Junior Standing, and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department

    Individualized descriptive or experimental research projects or directed readings under the direction of a project director and two other faculty committee members appointed by the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.

    Note: A written report must be approved by the committee. May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    BSM 131 - General Microbiology

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: BSB 141  or PSC 111  (w/lab). Recommended: High school Chemistry, PS 108  or PSC 111  

    A study of the fundamental concepts and methods of microbiology, including morphology, physiology, biochemical activities, inheritance, basic immunology, and importance in medicine, public health and the environment.

  
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    BSM 131L - General Microbiology Laboratory

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: BSB 141  or PSC 111  (w/lab) Prerequisite/Corequisite: BSM 131  

    A laboratory course designed to complement lectures in BSM 131  

  
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    BSM 340 - Microbiology for Majors

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 101 , BSB 101L , PSC 111 , PSC 111L , and EN 101  

    A comprehensive study of microbial cell physiology, genetics, development and cell ultra-structure with an emphasis on the role of microorganisms in medicine, agriculture, the environment, evolution and in industry.

  
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    BSM 342 - Food Microbiology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSM 131  (w/lab) or BSM 340  (w/lab)

    A course designed to provide the student with first-hand knowledge and experience in isolating, handling, and identifying microorganisms associated with food spoilage, food production, and food-borne diseases.

  
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    BSM 456 - Pathogenic Microbiology

    Credits: 4

    Lecture-Laboratory

    Prerequisite: BSB 141  and BSB 142  or BSB 322  

    Examination of the etiology, symptomatology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures employed in the isolation and identification of medically significant microorganisms, with consideration of some aspects of their virulence and their effects on man.

  
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    BSM 485 - Special Topics in Biology or Microbiology

    Credits: 2-4

    Prerequisite: Junior standing in Biological Sciences and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    In-depth considerations of selected biological topics presented as a formal course or seminar format. A term paper may be required.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit.

  
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    BSM 499 - Independent Study in Biology or Microbiology

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing, and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    Individualized descriptive or experimental research projects or directed readings under the direction of a project director and two other faculty committee members appointed by the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.

    Note: A written report must be approved by the committee. May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    BU 105 - Fundamentals of Success in Business

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Bachelor of Bunisness Administration and Bachelor Applied Science in Business Administration majors only

    This course identifies fundamental elements and skills necessary to be successful throughout the business administration program of study. The student will explore concepts such as the construction of the business curriculum, student responsibilities in the academic advising process, appropriate conduct for business students, standards of academic integrity, use of appropriate formatting, style, and citation in business research, time management of online courses, and career planning. Prerequisite: Bachelor of Business Administration and Bachelor Applied Science in Business Administration majors only. A/B/C/NC Grading.

  
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    BU 111 - Introduction to Business

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the manner in which core business principles are used to achieve successful outcomes for businesses and organizations of varying sizes.

  
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    BU 299 - Special Topics in Business

    Credits: 1-3

    Courses taught at irregular intervals or upon the demand of at least 10 students; course developed to meet special needs, times or current relevant topics in the business area.

  
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    BU 303 - Readings in Business

    Credits: 1

    This course explores critical issues in business through various readings either classical or contemporary. Examples of issues that may be studied include (but are not limited to): business strategy, corporate/social responsibility, entrepreneurship, financial markets, the future, innovation and technology, or leadership. Course is open to both business majors and non-majors. Repeatable for up to 3 hours. Student may not receive credit for same reading twice.

  
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    BU 383 - Leadership

    Credits: 3

    This course examines various leadership theories and styles utilized in business and community organizations. Concepts and applications of goal setting, team building, negotiating, and communicating are discussed and practiced. students analyze case examples from organizations, and examine and develop their personal leadership styles and potentials through collaborative and experiential learning experiences.

  
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    BU 399 - Special Topics in Business

    Credits: 1-3

    Courses taught at irregular intervals or upon the demand of at least 10 students; course developed to meet special needs, times or current relevant topics in the business area.

  
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    BU 400 - Internship

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Advanced standing, 2.5 GPA overall and in major

    A practical, structured program of work experience with a participating employer of the student intern’s choice. The student intern must be employed a minimum of 40 to 120 hours depending on the internship (40 hours = 1 credit). The student intern must be supervised by the employer and a faculty member. The student intern must complete a research paper on a subject that will benefit the employer, a personal journal, and the supervisor’s evaluation must be submitted prior to the end of the semester in order for the student to gain credit for this course.

    Note: Internship may be taken twice for a total of 6 hours.

  
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    BU 460 - Senior Seminar in Business

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Business major or minor and senior standing or approval of the Department Chair

    Examines contemporary issues in the business environment to understand how they are changing the managerial job and modifying the role of business in society. Covers college-to-career transition with the development of an electronic portfolio that focuses on industry analysis, individual job analysis, career exploration, and job preparation. Students taking this course as a requirement for the Bachelor of Technology Degree will also take the capstone exit exam.

  
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    BU 494 - Graduate Studies in Business Review

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: 2.7 Cumulative GPA, Graduating Senior, and Approval by Chair, Department of Business

    Examines admissions guidelines common to graduate schools of business. Preview problems to prepare students for the most popular examination for entry into graduate schools of business. Prepare written essays that are included as part of the application process.

  
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    BU 496 (1 hour) - Capstone Portfolio in Business

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair, Graduationg Seniors Only

    In this course, the student will integrate papers/projects from courses completed within designated courses from the major. The student will present these papers/projects and craft an executive summary that synthesizes key findings from the major.

  
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    BU 499 - Special Topics in Business

    Credits: 1-3

    Course taught at irregular intervals or upon demand of at least 10 students; course developed to meet special needs, times or current relevant topics in the business area.

  
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    CA 101 - Culinary Basics

    Credits: 1

    Basic culinary techniques and vocabulary; kitchen organization and operation.

  
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    CA 102 - Bread Baking

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    Basics of baking yeast and quick breads.

  
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    CA 103 - Pastries and Desserts

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of pastries and desserts.

  
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    CA 104 - Meats and Fish

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of meat and fish dishes.

  
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    CA 105 - Cold Foods

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of cold foods (garde manager).

  
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    CA 106 - Soups, Stocks, Sauces and Gravies

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    Basic soups, stocks, sauces, and gravies used in food preparation.

  
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    CA 107 - Regional Cuisines

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of regional world cuisines including Italian, Southwestern, Asian, Creole/Cajun, Mediterranean, and Indian.

  
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    CA 108 - Nutrition/Healthy Foods

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    A basic understanding of the role of proper nutrition and application to the preparation of healthy foods.

  
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    CA 109 - Vegetables

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of vegetable dishes.

  
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    CA 110 - Potatoes, Grains and Pasta

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: CA 101  

    The preparation of potatoes, grains, and pasta.

  
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    CA 111 - The Basics of Menus and Recipes

    Credits: 1

    The preparation of menus and recipes, including substitutions and adaptations.

  
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    CA 112 - The Basics of Entertaining

    Credits: 1

    Basic elements of entertainingbeverage selection, table settings, food display, table etiquette.

  
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    CA 115 - Wine Appreciation

    Credits: 1

    An exploration of wine history and wine making techniques combined with sensory development and an analysis of wines from around the world.

  
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    CA 125 - ServSafe®

    Credits: 1

    Food safety training leading to national ServSafeAE Certification.

  
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    CA 199 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 1-3

    Selected topics courses address specific subjects or contemporary issues in culinary arts.

    Note: Course may be repeated up to a maximum of six (6) credit hours.

  
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    CA 200 - Introduction to Culinary Arts

    Credits: 3

    Career options in culinary arts and the food and hospitality industry; introduction to kitchen operation and cuisines, food history, food safety and sanitation.

  
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    CA 260 - Introduction to Culinary Management

    Credits: 3

    Basic application of fundamental entrepreneurial skills in a culinary-specific environment.

  
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    CA 300 - Food Preparation I (with laboratory)

    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite: CA 200  

    Techniques used in cooking; food identification, handling, and preparation; preparation of soups, stocks and sauces; basics of baking; salad preparation; pasta and grains.

  
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    CA 301 - Food Preparation II (with laboratory)

    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite: CA 300  

    Intermediate level of food preparation meat fabrication; basic charcuterie; smoked products; plate presentation; meal planning for large groups and off-premise catering.

  
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    CA 310 - Dining Room Services

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 200  

    Food service preparation for dining services, history of food service, beverage identification and management as well as staff coordination.

    Note: Concurrent enrollment in CA 300  recommended.

  
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    CA 315 - Demonstration Techniques

    Credits: 3

    Focuses on adequate knowledge and skills necessary for presenting, demonstrating and merchandising various items or procedures.

  
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    CA 350 - Internship

    Credits: 6-12

    Prerequisite: CA 301  and recommendation of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    Supervised application of knowledge and skills in a food service program.

  
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    CA 361 - Accounting and Finance for Culinary Ventures

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 113 , MIS 157  , and CA 260  

    Principles and practical application of culinary financial data to the flow of the accounting cycle for production of financial statements. Emphasis on stand-alone culinary enterprises.

  
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    CA 362 - Business Law for Culinary Managers

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 200 , CA 260  

    Study of entrepreneurial legal issues in a culinary industry context. Stresses critical thinking skills, organizational structure, and provides an overview of basic legal issues.

  
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    CA 363 - Culinary Service Design and Management

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 200 , CA 260 , CA 310  

    Food and beverage service systems design and management. Emphasis on the customer service aspect of culinary ventures from the perspective of organizational management.

  
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    CA 364 - Culinary Venture Marketing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 260  

    Study of the fundamentals of marketing research, planning, and strategy as applied to culinary ventures. Emphasis on the development of market planning and research skills.

  
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    CA 365 - Applied Human Resource Management for Culinary Businesses

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 200 , CA 260  

    Applied perspective of human resource management for culinary-specific environments.

  
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    CA 375 - Advanced Baking I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 300  

    The theory and practice of operating a small bakery or pasty shop. Provides experience in producing French and American pastries and baked goods. Emphasis is on producing products from scratch, by hand.

  
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    CA 385 - Advanced Baking II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 375  

  
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    CA 399 - Selected Topics in Culinary Arts

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the Director

    Selected topics courses address specific subjects or contemporary issues in culinary arts.

    Note: Course may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours.

  
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    CA 400 - Food Preparation III (with laboratory)

    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite: CA 301  

    Advanced level of food preparation; emphasis on distinctive and complex food preparations; extensive menu-based meal planning and presentation.

  
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    CA 401 - World Cuisines

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 301  

    Regional cuisines from throughout the world and application of cooking methods used in these cuisines including distinctive ingredients and approaches to food preparation.

  
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    CA 410 - Business Skills in the Culinary Arts

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MIS 157  , MIS 160  or MA 123  

    Basic business skills and business mathematics applied to the food industry.

  
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    CA 415 - Food Styling

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ART 103 , ART 104 , ART 220  or permission of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    Concepts and techniques for food presentation to the camera, including styling techniques; the process of preparing food for still photography and videos; selecting tools and props; choosing and treating ingredients for presentation and endurance; and bringing the plate to camera readiness; food styling problems related to photography.

    Note: Requires the development of a food styling kit.

  
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    CA 450 - International Internship

    Credits: 6-12

    Prerequisite: CA 301 , CA 401  and recommendation of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    Supervised application of knowledge and skills in a food service program in an international setting.

  
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    CA 451 - Independent Study

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    For culinary arts majors pursuing a minor in nutrition/wellness, the declaration of the minor is also required. Original or independent study and research in selected topics related to the field of culinary arts and the student’s career objectives.

  
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    CA 460 - Seminar in Culinary Management

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: All other courses in the Culinary Management curriculum

    Capstone course in culinary entrepreneurship. Emphasis on case analysis and the development and presentation of a comprehensive culinary business plan.

  
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    CA 490 - Gender and Culinary Management

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 260  and MIS 160  or MA 123  

    Exploration of the economic and cultural contexts of gender in the culinary marketplace. Specific attention will be given to women’s roles and spheres of influence in business today, with a view towards the future of women-led culinary enterprises.

  
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    CA 492 - Service Business Operations and Strategy

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 123  or MIS 160  and CA 260  

    Provides the context for studying operations management in service industries. Course content organized around service economy, competition, delivery and quantitative analysis tools.

  
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    CA 499 - Selected Topics in Culinary Management

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: CA 200 , CA 260  or concurrent enrollment in CA 363  and CA 365  

    Addresses specific subjects or contemporary issues in culinary entrepreneurship.

  
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    COM 100 - Student Media Seminar

    Credits: 0

    Students will gain media experience through assigned work with student media outlets such as the campus radio station WMUW, and the campus online/print newspaper The Spectator

    Note: Pass/No Credit. Open only to Communication majors or by permissions of the Department Chair of Communication. Students majoring in Communication are required to pass two (2) semesters of COM 100 for graduation.

  
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    COM 101 - Oral Communication

    Credits: 3

    Introduction to the principles and practices of basic oral communication. Modification of existing behavior and/or the addition of new skills necessary in everyday interpersonal and public communication situations.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 102 - Introduction to Mass Communication

    Credits: 3

    A survey of the development, history, and place in society of mass media from the printing press to the Internet.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 103 - Introduction To Media Technology

    Credits: 3

    Laboratory and demonstration. Audio and video equipment operation and production techniques. Primary emphasis on basic television production techniques and video streaming technology.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 200 - Writing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 101  and MIS 157  or higher computer-based course

    A foundation course in news gathering and writing for print and broadcast media including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, advertising, and public relations. Practical applications on radio station WMUW and campus newspaper, The Spectator.

  
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    COM 201 - Relational Communication

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 101  

    An analysis of the fundamentals of interpersonal and digitally-mediated interactive communication theory, principles and practices.

  
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    COM 204 - Announcing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 101 , COM 103  

    Study, practice, and application of basic announcing techniques for radio and television.

  
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    COM 210 - Advertising

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200  or MGT 333 

    A survey of contemporary advertising’s core components from initial concepts through final execution. Theoretical approaches include analysis of persuasive campaigns, media platforms, and regulatory and social environments. Practical, applied knowledge will be enhanced through hands-on development of advertising campaigns.

  
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    COM 250 - Newsgathering

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 103  and COM 200  

    An advanced course in newsgathering and writing for print and digital media with a particular focus on convergence-based journalism. Students will prepare news content for multiple media platforms. Students are required to prepare content for both the print and online versions of campus newspaper, The Spectator, and radio station WMUW.

  
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    COM 299 - Special Topics in Communication

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    This course allows flexibility in offering selected topics in Communication.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

  
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    COM 303 - Images of Women in Film

    Credits: 3

    An examination of how women have been depicted on celluloid in both American and international films, from the early silents to today’s liberated cinema. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to evaluate the presentation of women in these films, based within the context of the society and the era that produced individual films as well as the place of women within a traditionally male-dominated commercial business industry, and how that presentation has evolved since the early days of the cinema.

    Also Listed as: FLM 303  and WS 303  
  
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    COM 307 - Advanced Writing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200  

    A survey of the concepts and practices of in-depth reporting, such as gathering information from sources, making and communicating observations in writing, verifying material, and assembling stories for various media (including print, broadcast, and Web). Practical applications will include writing articles for The Spectator and other news sources.

  
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    COM 310 - Digital Culture

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102  and COM 200  

    This course examines the development, uses, and effects of digital technology on culture.

  
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    COM 320 - Mass Communication and Society

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102  and COM 200  

    Introduction to basic principles, theories and methods of mass communication and public opinion research.

  
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    COM 325 - Visual Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Computer-based course

    This course addresses visual literacy in both theory and practical application. Theoretical topics addressed range from visual perception to legal and ethical issues related to images and other content. Practical applications include creation of print and multimedia products. Students will use digital photography and software applications to address the visual elements of integrated design.

  
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    COM 331 - Audio Production

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 103  

    An audio production course with emphasis on production of announcements and programs. Particular attention given to program content, aesthetics, as well as programming practices in commercial and non-commercial radio in light of competing and emerging media. Practical application on campus radio station WMUW.

  
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    COM 400 - Practicum

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: Passed two semesters of COM 100 , 12 hours in Communication and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    Practical experience will be gained through assigned work with WMUW, the university radio station, The Spectator, the campus newspaper, and other campus labs or offices such as the Public Affairs Office. This course will be repeatable for up to two hours.

  
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    COM 410 - Media Law & Ethics

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102  and 12 hours in Communication

    This course provides students with an overview of the legal and ethical environment in which mass media operate. Aspects of freedom of speech, limitations on speech, intellectual property rights, and related topics will be covered.

  
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    COM 413 - Public Relations

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200  

    An overview of the principles and proven techniques in gaining public acceptance for a product, an occasion, a cause, or an institution along with governmental public affairs. Crisis Management by the Public Relations Professional will be a recurring and important component. Attention is given to writing the publicity article, preparing brochures, planning promotion campaigns for selected subjects through various mass media and crises communication. Also included will be the Legal Environment and Ethics involved in Public Relations. Case studies of practiced techniques and application of principles and ethics of public relations.

  
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    COM 425 - Advanced Visual Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 325  or Permission of the Department Chair of Communication.

    This course addresses visual literacy, project planning, and design execution in both theory and practical application with online multimedia designs. Students are introduced to advanced topics and developing issues.

 

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