Jan 20, 2022  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

12. Courses


 
  
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    COM 410 - Media Law & Ethics

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102  and 12 hours in Communication

    This course provides students with an overview of the legal and ethical environment in which mass media operate. Aspects of freedom of speech, limitations on speech, intellectual property rights, and related topics will be covered.

  
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    COM 413 - Public Relations

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200  

    An overview of the principles and proven techniques in gaining public acceptance for a product, an occasion, a cause, or an institution along with governmental public affairs. Crisis Management by the Public Relations Professional will be a recurring and important component. Attention is given to writing the publicity article, preparing brochures, planning promotion campaigns for selected subjects through various mass media and crises communication. Also included will be the Legal Environment and Ethics involved in Public Relations. Case studies of practiced techniques and application of principles and ethics of public relations.

  
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    COM 425 - Advanced Visual Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 325  or Permission of the Department Chair of Communication.

    This course addresses visual literacy, project planning, and design execution in both theory and practical application with online multimedia designs. Students are introduced to advanced topics and developing issues.

  
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    COM 431 - Video Production

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 103  

    A production course with emphasis on producing and directing video programs.

  
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    COM 454 - Problems in Mass Communication

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 12 hours in Communication and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    Independent study. Projects will be assigned to fit student needs and/or interests.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

  
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    COM 460 - Internship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Advanced standing, 2.5 QPA overall and in major

    A practical, structured program of work experience with a participating employer. Interns must be employed a minimum of 120 hours, must be supervised by the employer and a faculty member, and must have a tangible academic component (journal, research paper, portfolio, etc.), which should be submitted at the end of the internship period.

    Note: Internship may be taken twice for a total of 6 hours.

  
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    COM 465 - Communication Senior Seminar

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 250 , COM 310 , COM 320 , and senior standing

    Capstone course in communication that includes survey and application of theory and research methods, creation of original career projects designed to showcase students’ talents, and completion of comprehensive portfolios designed to market students to prospective employers and graduate programs.

  
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    COM 499 - Special Topics in Communication

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: COM 200 , advanced standing, and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    This course allows flexibility in offering selected advanced topics in Communication.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

  
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    DEC 200 - Science of Decision-Making

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 123 , BQA 170 , or HED 241  

    This course explores factors that influence choices made by individuals and organizations, evaluates decision-making models, demonstrates the application of appropriate tools to analyzing decision-making, measures the quality of outcomes achieved from made decisions, and identifies ways to make better decisions.

  
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    EC 201 - Principles of Economics I

    Credits: 3

    Intended for the student who wants a study of our economic system and the way it works. Topics include macroeconomic issues, money and banking, Federal Reserve System, Keynesian Theory, monetarism, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal policy and current economic problems.

  
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    EC 202 - Principles of Economics II

    Credits: 3

    Intended for the student who wants a study of our economic system and the way it works. Topics include microeconomic issues, consumer choice, business firms, perfect competition, monopoly, labor markets, agriculture, antitrust, public choice, poverty and current economic problems.

  
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    EC 335 - Health Care Economics and Finance

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EC 202  

    A survey of major topics in health care economics and finance. There will be a focus on the supply of, and demand for health care services, workforce issues, the organization and financing of the U.S. health care system, and federal health care legislation. Portfolio paper required for course completion.

  
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    EC 399 - Special Topics in Economics

    Credits: 3

    A variable content course in which students pursue topics or subjects of current interest in the field of Economics that are not part of the regular curriculum. The specific topic is announced when the course is offered.

    Note: May be repeated with change in content.

  
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    EC 499 - Independent Projects in Economics

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of the Instructor and Department Chair

    Independent project for an advanced or special-interest Economics topic conducted under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

    Note: May be repeated with a change in content.

  
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    ED 100 - Reading For College

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to strengthen students’ college level reading comprehension skills. Basic reading skills taught will include building vocabulary, selecting main ideas and supporting details, and recognizing relationships in college level writing. In addition, the critical reading skills of evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting written information will be taught. Finally, specific active reading strategies will also be taught.

    Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

  
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    ED 101 - Praxis Seminar (Writing)

    Credits: 0

    Praxis Seminar is designed for teacher education candidates who are having difficulty passing Praxis I. The course will meet for one hour each week and will consist of individual and small group instruction in writing and English usage.

    Note: Candidates may take the course as often as they wish.

  
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    ED 206 - Developing Critical Analytic and Intuitive Thinking

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to assist students in developing critical and creative thinking skills. Students will investigate and practice various modes of thinking to include Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking, Intuitive Thinking, Analytical Thinking, and Logic. These skills will be developed by the student to enhance personal and professional decision making and to become equipped to use these skills in their future endeavours.

  
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    ED 294 - Media Literacy Education

    Credits: 3

    Media Literacy is the ability to encode and decode the symbols transmitted via media and the ability to synthesize, analyze and produce mediated messages. Media literacy education involves teaching the skills associated with media literacy and addresses the interdependent nature and impact of media content and communication technology on self and others. The primary focus of this course will be the roll of media and technology in early childhood development but will address media effects and use across a variety of contexts.

    Also Listed as: COM 294  
  
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    ED 297 - The Computer and the Classroom

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of computers and of the applications of the computer in educational settings.

  
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    ED 299 - Special Topics in Education

    Credits: 1-3

    The course allows flexibility in offering selected topic courses or workshops for credit.

  
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    ED 300 - Education as a Profession

    Credits: 3

    This course seeks to involve prospective teachers in the issues of schooling and education and to give them a clear view of the skills and knowledge they will need to be successful professionals. The philosophical foundations and history of American education, governance, finance, and ethical and legal issues are discussed. Formal application for “Admission to Teacher Education” will be made during the course.

  
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    ED 302 - Art and Science of Teaching

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 300  for all education majors/ ED 306  and ED 311  for Elementary Education majors.

    This course focuses on preparing students to use the INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) Core Standards as the basis for planning meaningful instruction, managing the classroom environment, and meeting needs of diverse learners. Candidates will practice selecting appropriate teaching methods, developing lesson plans, and using technology in the classroom.

    Note: 10 hours of field experience required for specialty and secondary education majors; Elementary Education majors must take this course with ED 311  for field experience; no exemptions will be granted.

  
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    ED 304 - Principles of Early Childhood Learning

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: Corequisite ED 300  

    A survey of contemporary approaches, practices, and issues in early childhood education including the background history, philosophy and theory of their origins. The basics of physical, social and cognitive development will be addressed along with the increasingly diverse student population found in today’s schools. Emphasis will also be placed on the interrelationship of home and community in the development of the young child.

    Note: 5 hours of field experience required; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 305 - Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 111 , MA 112  (grade of C or above), ED 302 , and admission to Teacher Education Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 310 , ED 312 , ED 334 , and ED 335  

    A survey of techniques needed in teaching arithmetical concepts and the four fundamental processes of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, as well as elementary percentage, geometry, and measurement. Experiences are provided to insure competence in teaching estimation and problem solving. Stress is given to the use of these in meaningful situations for children. Special attention is placed on the Teacher as Decision Maker in applying the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics as developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

  
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    ED 306 - Introduction to Exceptional Learners

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 300  for all education majors/ED 302  and ED 311  for Elementary Education majors

    This course includes concepts, perspectives, and guiding principles that are basic to an understanding of human exceptionality. Individual areas of exceptionality will be explored as well as issues relative to ethnic diversity.

    Note: 10 hours of field experience required for specialty and secondary education majors; Elementary Education majors must take this course with ED 311  for field experience; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 307 - Children’s Literature in Pre-K Through Grade 3

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 304  

    This course is an introduction to children’s literature, genres of children’s literature, the qualities of classic and current children’s literature, and focuses on the exploration of children’s literature and its role in Pre-K through Third Grade classrooms. Current Theories and methods of integrating literature into all curriculum areas will be discussed and demonstrated.

  
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    ED 309 - Mathematics in K-3

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300 , ED 302  

    A survey of techniques needed in teaching arithmetical concepts and Counting and Cardinality, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Measurement and Data, and Geometry. Stress is given to the use of these in meaningful situations for children. Special attention is placed on the Teacher as Decision Maker in applying the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics as developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

  
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    ED 310 - Teaching Social Studies in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302 , must have completed all core Social Studies courses Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 305 , ED 312 , ED 334 , and ED 335  

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to translate knowledge and data gathering processes from history and the social sciences into appropriate and meaningful social studies experiences for students.

  
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    ED 311 - Elementary Residency 1

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 302   and ED 306  

    This introductory course is designed to provide initial clinical based experiences designed to develop well-rounded professionals in a school setting under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. A gradual schedule of teaching responsibility is implemented based upon individual teacher candidate readiness. Coaching conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor to guide the teacher candidate in becoming a reflective decision maker. This course requires a minimum grade of C and may only be taken twice. Failure to complete the minimum required field hours will result in a failing grade.

    Note: This course must be taken with ED 302 and ED 306; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 312 - Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302 , must have completed all core Science courses Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 305 , ED 310 , ED 334 , and ED 335  

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to focus on academic, personal, social, and career applications of the biological, earth, space, and physical sciencesas well as concepts in science and technology, the history and nature of science, and the inquiry process scientists use, in order to develop skills in instruction that promotes understanding and positive attitudes among students.

  
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    ED 317 - Behaviors in Early Childhood

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 304  

    This course stresses developmentally appropriate techniques and materials fostering successful behavior development and learning in young children, 3 through age 8. The purpose is to gain an understanding of behaviors of young children, behavior guidance, assessing, teaching and nurturing prosocial behaviors and development of appropriate behavioral expectations for very young children.

  
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    ED 319 - Early Childhood Language and Literacy

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: ED 304  

    This course examines language development from birth through primary-aged children. Special attention will be paid to linguistically diverse populations and children whose language development differs from the expected norm, with regards to the most recent advances in the field. Selection and development of pre-reading/prewriting and reading and writing curricula for preschool and kendergarten will be addressed. There will be an emphasis on development of literacy and use of appropriate literature in preK-K instruction.

    This course includes 5 hours of clinical experience.


  
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    ED 320 - Developmentally Appropriate Materials and Methods in Early Childhood Education

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: ED 317  ED 319  

    This course addresses developmentally appropriate techniques and materials fostering successful development and learning in young children, infancy through age 8. This is a three credit hour course designed for prospective early childhood teachers. The purpose is to help with young children ages 3 through 8 years of age.

    This course includes 5 hours of clinical experience.


  
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    ED 334 - Methods for Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302 , EN 101 , EN 102   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 305 , ED 310 , ED 312 , and ED 335  

    This course is designed to provide the methods and materials for making appropriate professional decisions in teaching reading and the language arts in grades K-8. Emphasis is placed on a literature-based approach to instruction in oral and written language, spelling, handwriting and grammar.

  
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    ED 335 - Elementary Residency 3



    Prerequisite: ED 361 , ED 362 , ED 366 , and ED 367   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 305 , ED 310 , ED 312 , and ED 334  

    This pre-internship course is designed to provide advanced materials and methods of teaching clinical-based experiences designed to develop well-rounded professionals in a school setting under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. A gradual schedule of teaching responsibility is implemented based upon individual teacher candidate readiness. Coaching conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor to guide the teacher candidate in becoming a reflective decision maker. This course requires a minimum grade of C and may only be taken twice. Failure to complete the minimum required field hours will result in a failing grade.

    Note: This course must be taken with ED 305 , ED 310 , ED 312 , and ED 334 ; no exemptions will be granted.

  
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    ED 351 - Educational Measurement

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to examine assessment techniques, test construction, test statistics, interpretation, application, and their relationship to instructional decisions. Major attention is given to the construction of classroom assessment instruments and determination of their reliability and validity. Ethical issues of assessment, assessment needs of diverse populations, and standardized testing instruments are also examined.

  
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    ED 360 - Educational Psychology

    Credits: 3

    This course presents an overview of the process of learning. It provides students with skills needed to work with others in an educational setting. It includes coverage of theories of development, assessing and dealing with individual variability, devising objectives, learning theories, motivation, and measurement and evaluation of learning.

  
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    ED 361 - Early Literacy Instruction I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 302  

    The act of teaching is a reflective decision making process involving interactions with students, colleagues, parents and members of the community. This course is designed to introduce students to theory and best practices in literacy, concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development, and systematic early reading and writing instruction specific to concepts about print, phonemic awareness and phonics.

  
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    ED 362 - Early Literacy Instruction II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite:  ED 302  and ED 361   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 365  and ED 366  

    The major emphasis of this course will be concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development and early systematic reading and writing instruction specific to vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

  
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    ED 365 - Content Area Reading

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 302   Prerequisite/Corequisite: ED 367  for Elementary Education majors

    The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to strategies for teaching reading in the content areas. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of comprehension strategies across the curriculum.  10 hours Field Experiences

    Note: 10 hours of field experience required for specialty and secondary education majors; Elementary Education majors must take this course with ED 367 for field experience; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 366 - Reading Assessment and Intervention

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 302   Prerequisite/Corequisite:  ED 365  and ED 367  

    The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with a strong knowledge base of various assessment methods and intervention strategies for teaching reading. Students will be expected to demonstrate the application of assessment methods and intervention strategies. 

    Note: Elementary Education majors must take this course with ED 367   for field experience; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 367 - Elementary Residency 2

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 302 , ED 306 , ED 304 , and ED 311   Prerequisite/Corequisite:  ED 365 , and ED 366  

    This intermediate course is designed to provide teaching of reading clinical based experiences designed to develop well-rounded professionals in a school setting under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. A gradual schedule of teaching responsibility is implemented based upon individual teacher candidate readiness. Coaching conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and university supervisor to guide the teacher candidate in becoming a reflective decision maker. This course requires a minimum grade of C and may only be taken twice. Failure to complete the minimum required field hours will result in a failing grade.

    Note: This course must be taken with ED 365  and ED 366 ; no exemptions will be granted

  
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    ED 401 - Classroom Management

    Credits: 3

    The course is designed to examine basic effective classroom management practices for the K-12 learning environment. The course focus includes how to create a positive and inviting classroom culture, recognize proactive techniques to foster desired behaviors, implement behavioral interventions, recognize effective instructional delivery techniques and professional educator attributes, which all work to develop responsibility, self-control, and character in K-12 students.

  
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    ED 404 - Teacher Internship: Early Childhood

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a preschool internship center under the direction of qualified center directors and university supervisors. Observation precedes actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor director and the university supervisor for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed.

    Note: This course may be repeated for a total of 18 hours.

  
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    ED 406 - Teacher Internship: Elementary

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Teacher Internship.

  
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    ED 407 - Observation and Directed Teaching Grades K-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher Interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Teacher Internship.

  
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    ED 409 - Observation and Directed Teaching in Secondary Education Grades 7-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a teacher internship center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the mentor teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed.  Teacher Interns will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Teacher Interns will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Teacher Internship.

  
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    ED 449 - Instructional Assessment Practices and Procedures

    Credits: 3

    This course provides professionals with skills in the application of assessment practices and procedures necessary for decision-making in planning and differentiating instruction. Serves current undergraduates who with to qualify for alternate route provisional teaching licensure without first applying for graduate studies (MAT)

    Also Listed as: ED 549
  
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    ED 451 - Managing the Instructional Environment

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the stucture of the instructional environment and its relevance of the learner’s motivation, development, and behavior. Serves current undergraduates who wish to qualify for alternate route provisional teaching licensure without first applying for graduate studies (MAT).

    Also Listed as: ED 551
  
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    ED 498 - Instructional Technology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 297   or a computer course

    This course will focus on fundamental concepts and skills for applying instructional technologies to educational settings and for making decisions regarding the most appropriate use. The instructional technologies include authoring/development software, multimedia computers, electronic presentation/projection systems, Internet access, and TV/VCR applications. This course is elective for education majors and recommended for graduate students.

  
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    ED 499 - Special Topics In Education

    Credits: 1-6

    Students must be admitted to Graduate Studies to enroll in courses numbered 500 or above.

    Note: (Undergraduate) This course will be used to address major topics and issues of interest and need in the field of education. Extended studies will be conducted in professional development areas affecting the role of school in society.

  
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    EDS 313 - Introduction to Special Education

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 306  

    Introduction to the legal, philosophical and educational bases of the education of the handicapped. Particular emphasis is given to state and federal law, referral to placement, use of cumulative records and Individual Education Plan development.

  
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    EDS 320 - Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 306  

    This course includes instructional management planning, individual education program development, materials, resources, and strategies for teaching students with mild/moderate handicaps.

  
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    EDS 324 - Teaching in the Inclusion Classroom

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EDS 313  and admission to Teacher Internship or existing teacher certification

    This course is designed for students who have chosen special education as an add-on to an elementary or secondary education certification or for those holding teacher certification who wish to acquire skills necessary to teach special needs students in a general education classroom. The course material and learning activities prepare students to plan, deliver and assess instruction in an inclusion setting.

  
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    EDS 330 - Procedures for the Resource Room

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Internship

    This course focuses on the organization and procedures for the effective use of instruction, space, scheduling, materials, and personnel in both the elementary and secondary resource classroom. Administrative and teacher responsibilities will be included as well as techniques for collaboration and consultation with other professionals and parents.

  
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    EDS 414 - Practicum in the Elementary Resource Room

    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: Possession of an elementary teaching certificate or EDS 320  and EDS 330  

    Practicum experience in the education of elementary age mildly/moderately handicapped students. This course is designed to allow individuals who hold an elementary teaching certificate to add an Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped endorsement to their existing certificate.

  
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    EDS 415 - Practicum in the Secondary Resource Room

    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: Possession of a secondary or special subject area teaching certificate or EDS 320 , EDS 330  

    Practicum experience in the education of secondary age mild/moderately handicapped students. This course is designed to allow individuals who hold a secondary teaching certificate to add an Education of the Mildly/Moderately Handicapped endorsement to their existing certificate.

  
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    EN 100 - Basic Writing

    Credits: 3

    A study of essentials of grammar and composition with emphasis upon paragraph development. Instruction and exercises in writing and revision of writing. Required of freshmen whose proficiency in composition and reading is determined by testing to be below collegiate standards maintained in EN 101 . Prerequisite for entrance in EN 101  for students identified for the course.

    Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

  
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    EN 101 - English Composition I

    Credits: 3

    EN 101 is a study of the principles of composition and effective paragraph and sentence structure. Students will write, revise, and edit essays.  In order to support their ideas, students will learn to use evidence which may include readings, observations, interviews, and memories.  This course contains a documentation assignment.

    Note: Required of all students. Does not count toward the English major. Final grade is A, B, C, NC (No Credit). A student must earn a grade of at least a C in the course before enrolling in any other English course. A grade of No Credit will not affect a student’s quality point average.

  
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    EN 102 - English Composition II

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: EN 101  

    EN 102 is a study of analytical and interpretive skills necessary for constructing a well-supported argument.  Students will learn to integrate sources into their writing.  Students will develop information literacy and research skills, including writing a research paper with multiple sources.  Required of all students.  Does not count toward the English major.  Final grade is A, B, C, NC (No Credit).  A student must earn a grade of at least a C in the course before enrolling in any other English course.  A grade of No Credit will not affect a student’s quality point average.

     


  
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    EN 201 - Survey of Early English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of English literature from Beowulf through the mid eighteenth century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 202 - Survey of Late English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of English literature from the eighteenth century to modern times. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 203 - Survey of Early American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study of the development of American literature with emphasis on major writings and their relation to the main currents of American thought from the Spanish colonization to the mid nineteen century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 204 - Survey of Late American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study of the development of American literature with emphasis upon major writings and their relation to the main currents of American thought from the mid nineteenth century through the present. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 231 - Survey of Early World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A survey of major texts in the literatures of Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Middle East, focusing on myth, drama, epic, and lyric from the ancient world to the early modern era. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 232 - Survey of Late World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study of major texts in the literatures of Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas, focusing on important works of prose, drama, and poetry from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 260 - LGBTQ+ Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    This course introduces students to and gives a survey of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer+ Literature. The course covers canonical and noncanonical texts from a variety of time periods and cultures, representing the literary modes of poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction. The course explores topics such as defining LGBTQ+ Literature, the differences between and among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer literature and the changes in LGBTQ+ writing over time. This course asks students to use various literary models (LGBTQ critical theory, Feminist, African American, and New Historicism analysis) as lenses.

  
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    EN 270 - Studies in Popular Culture

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: EN 101  and EN 102   or permission of instructor

    This course will present an analysis of contemporary popular culture, including such subjects as television, video games, film, graphic narratives, music, advertising, social media, and popular literature.

     


  
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    EN 274 - Intro to the Graphic Novel

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 101  and EN 102  or permission of the instructor

    This course will be a study of the graphic novel from the beginning of Eisner’s term, through the development of various forms and structures, all the way to its present incarnation. The course will also look at many different genres such as, but not limited to, teen, horror, superhero, nonfiction, historical, memoir, experimental, and bande dessinee.

  
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    EN 291 - Methods for Tutors of Writing

    Credits: 3

    A study of the practicum of tutoring, this course will focus on strategies and principles of working with all types of writers and assignments in a variety of contexts, both in face-to-face tutorials as well as via digital media. This class will focus on the guiding principles for the writing process, the process of the tutoring session, and coping with different tutoring situations.

  
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    EN 299 - Special Topics in English

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    This course will be used for lower-level seminars. The course content will vary each time the course is offered.

  
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    EN 300 - Advanced Composition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A continuation of the study and computer-assisted practice of expository writing in standard English. The course focuses on analytical and practical writing skills. Some papers are based on documented research and reading in the student’s major field; others will simulate writing required in professional or work-place situations. Parallel readings, peer editing conferences, and conferences with the instructor are also included.

  
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    EN 302 - History and Structure of the English Language

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course begins with basic linguistic concepts and a brief study of phonology, and then moves through discussions of the major language families descended from Indo-European, English as a Germanic Language, Old English, Middle English, and Modern English. A special focus is placed upon the political and social aspects of language, as well as morphology, vocabulary, and grammar.

  
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    EN 303 - Early Shakespeare

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical reading of a number of Shakespeare’s plays written up to 1603. Collateral reading of critical essays.

  
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    EN 304 - Late Shakespeare

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical reading of a number of Shakespeare’s plays written after 1603. Collateral reading of critical essays.

  
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    EN 305 - Advanced Grammar

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course will explore the complexities of English syntax primarily from the perspective of structuralist linguistics. This course will also introduce students to other approaches to English syntax, such as traditional and transformational-generative grammar, and to English morphology.

  
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    EN 311 - Nonfiction Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study of various types of advanced exposition, formal and informal essays, and the principles of the short narrative, with collateral readings and practice in original writing of the various forms studied.

  
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    EN 312 - Creative Writing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    A study of the craft of creative writing. The course will focus on the development of a portfolio of poetry and short fiction through workshop discussions and individual conferences, along with collateral readings on the creative process, literary terms, and forms.

  
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    EN 315 - Playwriting

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 176  or EN 312  

    Students will participate in discussion of classic and contemporary play structure, complete specific writing assignments intended to exercise imagination, playwriting skills, and playwriting format, and will write a play.

    Also Listed as: TH 315  
  
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    EN 317 - Technical Writing

    Credits: 3



    Prerequisite: EN 102  

    Combined lecture-workshop approach to special forms, styles, and problems encountered in writing for industry and technology. Includes writing of mechanism description, process analysis, instructions, research reports, and also includes technical editing and use of graphics. Focus will bo on both print and digital media.

    [Combined lecture-workshop approach to special forms, styles, and problems encountered in writing for industry and technology. Includes writing of mechanism description, process ananlysis, insctructions, research reports, and also includes technical editing and use of graphics. Focus will be on both print and digital media.]


  
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    EN 334 - Ancient Greek and Roman Myth

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of ancient Greek and Roman myth in translation. Authors include Homer, Pindar, Ovid, Virgil, Hesiod, and others.

  
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    EN 341 - Teaching English as a Second Language

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    Introduction to major theories, methodology, and strategies of teaching English as a second language including an introduction to the historical background of methods used for teaching languages to non-native speakers and to various strategies that have been proposed in the field to improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. This task-based class will also focus on syllabi and lesson plan preparations.

  
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    EN 342 - Second Language Acquisition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A survey of the major theories of language acquisition, including theories of first language acquisition, theories of second-language acquisition, theories of language learning, styles and strategies of language learning, effect of personality and sociocultural factors on second language learning, and communicative competence with an emphasis on methods of acquiring a second language.

  
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    EN 350 - Women in Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    This course introduces students to both traditional stereotypes of women in literature and new ways to analyze literature by and about women. Using introductory feminist critical texts, students will learn to focus on what literature says and implies about women: their nature, their roles, their place in society. Readings may include works by Austen, George Eliot, the Brontes, Flaubert, Woolf, Stein, Welty, Atwood, Walker, Rich, and others.

    Also Listed as: WS 350  
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the EN section of this course.

  
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    EN 355 - The Bible as Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of The Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A critical study of the literary themes and genres of the Hebrew Bible, the Christian New Testament, and Apocryphal writings in English translation.  Focuses on themes such as exile/return and covenant and on genres such as origin stories, psalms, prophecy, wisdom literature, parables, epistles, and apocalyptic narrative.

    Also Listed as: REL 355  
  
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    EN 360 - African-American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of the major movements in the evolution of African-American literature from the eighteenth century to the present. It includes literary genres such as autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker.

  
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    EN 370 - Ethnic American Literatures

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy.

    A study of autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama by American ethnic writers, such as Native, Latino/a, African, Asian, Jewish, and Arab Americans.  Emphasis will be on themes, literary styles, and the historical experience of the writers as well as their contributions to the national literature.

  
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    EN 375 - Women in Medieval Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of the literature of the medieval period both by and about women, with special attention to the impact of the anti-feminist tradition. Some authors/works may include Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, Christine de Pisan, Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Margery Kempe, and Marie de France.

    Also Listed as: WS 375  
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the EN section of this course.

  
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    EN 380 - Native American Literatures and Religions

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy.

    A study of Native North American worldviews in traditional oral texts, including myths, songs, and oratory, a well as the genres of personal narrative, fiction, and poetry. Readings may include oral texts in transcription/translation and works in English by Charles Eastman, Zitkala Sa, D’Arcy McNickle, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Linda Hogan, among others.

    Also Listed as: REL 380  
  
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    EN 401 - Internship

    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Qualified students may earn credit for participating in a program approved in advance by the faculty advisor and department chair. The nature of the internship and the number of hours to be worked will determine the number of credit hours. A minimum of 120 hours is required for 3 hours credit. Three hours may be applied toward the major. Remaining hours will count as elective credit toward graduation.

  
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    EN 409 - Literature for Adolescents and Older Children

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 102  and a 200-level English course or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature, and Philosophy

    A study of adolescent and children’s fiction from the nineteenth century to the present. This course will investigate various issues in children’s literature theory. Collateral reading; critical essays.

  
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    EN 410 - Methods & Materials in Secondary English

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education

    A survey of major theories of composition and literature pedagogy, with practical applications to classroom situations. The course requires close reading of selected literary texts to prepare the texts for teaching; it also examines the process of writing pre-writing, writing, revision - with attention to making and evaluating writing assignments. Required for teacher certification.

    Note: This course does not count toward the English major or minor.

    Fall
  
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    EN 411 - Fiction Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 312  or EN 2133 articulated as elective MS Community College course

    An advanced study of fiction writing, the course will focus on the development of a portfolio of short fiction and involve workshop discussion of student works, along with collateral readings on the craft of fiction and contemporary short stories.

  
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    EN 412 - Poetry Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 312  or 3 hours of transfer credit in creative writing

    An advanced study of poetry writing, the course will focus on the development of a portfolio of poems and involve workshop discussion of student works, along with collateral readings of poetics and recent poetry.

  
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    EN 415 - Advanced Writing Workshop

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 411  or EN 412  and permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    The advanced workshop provides students with the opportunity to continue their study of fiction or poetry writing beyond the workshop level. It may be taken in conjunction with a workshop in fiction or poetry, or it may be taken as an independent study.

    Note: May be repeated once for credit if genre content or instructor changes.

  
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    EN 419 - Senior Portfolio

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: EN 411  or EN 412  

    The Senior Portfolio is the crowning achievement for students in the Creative Writing Concentration.  Student will review and revise creative work completed during their college careers, collect it in a bound portfolio, and write an introduction in consultation with a creative writing professor.  Students will also explore graduate school and professional opportunities in writing fields. 

    Note: Course is only offered pass/fail.

  
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    EN 420 - Seminar in English Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre, or other topic of English Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 425 - Seminar in American Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre or other topic of American Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 426 - Seminar in World Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    A study of a period, theme, genre or other topic of World Literature.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

  
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    EN 428 - Independent Study in English

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: One 300-level English course or permission of the Languages, Literature, and Philosophy Department Chair

    An in-depth study of a topic that is not covered in the course catalog.

    Note: May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

 

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