Nov 16, 2018  
2009-2010 Bulletin 
    
2009-2010 Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    PSY 455 - Research in Human Behavioral Sciences

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 and 454

    This is a basic course in the application of current research methods in the field of human behavioral research. The student is introduced to the selection and formulation of a research problem, development of a hypothesis, data collection and analysis.

  
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    PSY 490 - History and Systems of Psychology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 and advanced standing, with a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level psychology courses, or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies

    This course examines the philosophical and scientific roots of modern psychological thought. The origins of systems of psychology and the ways these systems were influenced by historical contexts and are reflected in contemporary psychology also are explored.

  
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    PSY 499 - Special Topics in Psychology

    Credits: 1-6

    Prerequisite: PSY 201

    This course allows flexibility in the offering of coursework for students who are interested in topics beyond the regular curriculum in the major.

  
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    REL 213 - Religions of the World

    Credits: 3

    A comparative study of the major living religions of the Far East, the Near East, and the West. Class lectures supplemented by selected films and recorded music.

  
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    REL 299 - Special Topics in Religion

    Credits: 3

    A focused study of some topic in religion.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six (6) hours.

  
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    REL 308 - Western Women’s Roles in Religion

    Credits: 3

    A study of the historical context of women’s roles and women’s significance in the religions of Western society.

    Also listed as WS 308
  
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    REL 350 - Medieval Christianity

    Credits: 3

    A study of Christianity from the end of the early Christian period (ca. 200) to the Reformation (1517), with an emphasis on theology, spirituality, and ecclesiology.

  
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    REL 403 - Current Trends in Religion

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: REL 213

    An advanced study of ongoing trends in selected world religions, such as the rise of fundamentalism, growing pluralism and the challenges of inter-religious dialogue, the increase of women in religious leadership, and the need to respond to global issues like poverty and climate change. Builds on previous study in REL 213.

  
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    SM 100 - Science/Mathematics Seminar

    Credits: 0

    Students will be exposed to a variety of research approaches, experiences, and career opportunities enabling them to gain a greater understanding of professional involvement in Science and Mathematics.

    Note: Pass/No Credit Open only to Science and Mathematics majors. Students majoring in all Science/Mathematics programs are required to pass four (4) semesters of SM 100 for graduation, except for transfer students with 60 or more transfer hours who are required to pass three (3) semesters of SM 100.

  
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    SM 101 - Environmental Science I

    Credits: 4

    Lecture and laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 113 or higher (not MA 123) or demonstrated proficiency in math

    An introductory course covering global and local topics in environmental science. Fundamental concepts in biology, physics, chemistry, and geology will be examined and applied to contemporary and historical environmental problems so that the student can synthesize the body of knowledge necessary to understand environmental issues.

  
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    SM 102 - Environmental Science II

    Credits: 4

    Lecture and laboratory

    Prerequisite: MA 113 or higher (not MA 123) or demonstrated proficiency in math; SM 101

    An introductory course continuing the examination of global and local topics in environmental science begun in SM 101. Emphasis will be given to critical analysis of specific problems and to understanding the models used to investigate these problems.

  
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    SM 125 - Fortran

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: MA 113

    This course will teach problem-solving methods using Fortran. Application will be made to problems in various fields but mathematical and scientific problems are stressed.

  
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    SM 135 - Programming in C++

    Credits: 3

    Lecture

    Prerequisite: MA 113

    Problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the computer programming language C++. Emphasis on scientific and mathematical applications.

  
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    SM 295 - Topics in Mathematics for Teachers

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    In-depth content on selected mathematical topics, including their relation and application to the classroom. This course is primarily intended for in-service teachers.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

  
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    SM 297 - Topics in Science for Teachers

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair

    In-depth content on selected science topics, including their relation and application to the classroom.

    Note: This course is primarily intended for in-service teachers. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Lecture.

  
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    SOC 201 - Principles of Sociology

    Credits: 3

    This introductory course provides an integral treatment of the fundamental principles of human association. Consideration is given to the nature of certain important social relationships, structures, and processes in which the student participates in home and community life, and to the understanding concerning them, which are derived from cultural anthropology and social psychology. An analysis is made of the structure and functions of major American social institutions, the ways in which they change, and the problems in contemporary society resulting from these changes.

  
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    SOC 299 - Special Topics in Sociology

    Credits: 1-3

    This course will address contemporary issues and advanced content areas in sociology.

    Note: Eligible to be repeated for a maximum of six total credit hours

  
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    SOC 303 - Social Problems

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 206, SOC 201, or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair

    The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to investigate some of the major social problems of our changing society. The problem, theoretical explanations concerning causation and possibilities for remedial action are examined. Major problems discussed are: crime, sexual deviation, the population crisis, drug abuse and urban problems.

  
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    SOC 305 - Marriage and the Family

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies

    The purpose of this course is to study martial family interactions with emphasis on interpersonal dynamics and developmental tasks over the family life cycle. The course includes the study of sex role development, mate selection, adjustments within interpersonal relationships, communication in the family, parent-child relations, familial responses to stress, and family violence.

    Also listed as FS 306
  
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    SOC 311 - Communities

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies

    This course investigates two broad areas of community knowledge: 1) the nature of community life, including the physical structure and growth of the city, the process of urbanization and its consequences, and 2) community organization of rural areas. The course includes a project that directly involves the student on an interaction basis with some aspect of community dynamics.

  
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    SOC 359 - Juvenile Justice System

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair

    This course provides the student a view of the nature, extent, and causal explanations of the problem of juvenile delinquency. The perspective taken involves an examination of the roles of the police, the courts, correction agencies, and other agencies dealing with the delinquent and his/her rehabilitation.

  
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    SOC 363 - Criminology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Department Chair Psychology and Family Studies

    This course will examine crime; its causes, prevention and treatment; the nature, types and extent of crime; and preventive and correctional programs as part of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on integrating social process and social structural explanations of criminal behavior.

  
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    SOC 456 - Minorities

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 6 semester hours in Human Behavioral Sciences courses, advanced standing, or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies

    A study of the cultural heritage of various groups and an analysis of the changing place and role of minorities in American Society. Special attention is paid to organizational development and the role of conflict in the creation of ethnic consciousness, sexism, political awareness, and group cohesion. Contemporary problems involving minority groups are evaluated from the historical, social, and remedial points of view.

  
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    SOC 458 - Sociology of Low Income Groups

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Six semester hours in Human Behavioral Sciences or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies

    This course analyzes poverty and its accompanying lifestyle. It acquaints the student with problems associated with low income and poverty and possible means of remediation, and critically evaluates the relationships among the different areas of our socioeconomic system and their influences on poverty. The course also deals with the differences in poverty among the poor white and the poor black. The course is designed for persons entering service vocations who will have significant contact with persons in the poverty syndrome.

  
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    SPA 200 - Survey of Communication Disorders

    Credits: 3

    Survey of the incidence, identification, classification, diagnosis and major treatment strategies for communication disorders frequently encountered in persons of all ages. Description of the profession of speech-language pathology and clinical audiology.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    SPA 201 - Phonetics

    Credits: 3

    Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet and training in the phonetic transcription of speech, including transcription of regional dialects.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    SPA 209 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism

    Credits: 3

    Basic study of the structure and functions of the organs of speech and hearing.

  
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    SPA 210 - The Development of Normal Speech and Language

    Credits: 3

    Study of the cognitive social, and environmental factors associated with the acquisition of normal speech and language, including an introduction to psycholinguistics and discussion of relevant anatomical and neurophysiological factors.

  
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    SPA 303 - Introduction to Audiology

    Credits: 3

    A survey of fundamental aspects of sound, the functioning of the auditory mechanism, basic methods of audiometric evaluation, and hearing-screening methods and program organization.

    Note: Observation required.

  
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    SPA 308 - Language Disorders in Children and Their Treatment

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 210

    Study of the identification, description, and treatment approaches for language disorders in children, including program design.

    Note: Observation required.

  
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    SPA 311 - Basic Clinical Strategies in Speech-Language Pathology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 308 and 321 or permission of the Department Chair of Speech-Language Pathology

    Overview of the basic strategies of therapeutic intervention for communicatively-disordered children and adults. Emphasis is placed upon rationales for selecting treatment models appropriate to individual client needs; the development and implementation of appropriate treatment programs; salient features of the client-clinician relations; and the assessment of treatment outcomes. Observation of diagnostic and treatment sessions required.

  
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    SPA 313 - Speech and Hearing Science

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 209

    Study of the nature of sound, sound transmission, and units of measurement necessary to understand the physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual parameters of speech. Includes discussion of electro-acoustical instruments employed in speech, hearing and language research and testing.

  
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    SPA 321 - Principles of Therapy: Articulation

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 201 and 209

    A survey of current information regarding identification, causation, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of articulation and phonological system in children and adults. Observation of diagnostic and treatment sessions required.

  
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    SPA 350 - Program Planning in Speech-Language Pathology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 308, 311, and 321

    This course acquaints students with issues in service delivery in various settings, with emphasis upon the public schools including laws; procedural safeguards; eligibility determination; development of caseloads, scheduling of individual and group therapy; cooperation with other professionals in the program; interactions with parents; accountability procedures; budget considerations; referrals; follow-up procedures; and in-service activities.

  
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    SPA 400 - Clinical Practicum: Speech and Hearing Center

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Approval from the Undergraduate Practicum Coordinator See Clinical Requirements/Responsibilities

    Supervised Practicum in the treatment of speech and/or language disorders in children and adults under the supervision of the faculty at the Speech and Hearing Center.

    Note: May be repeated.

  
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    SPA 403 - Strategies in Therapy for the Hearing Impaired

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 303 (or its equivalent)

    Discussion of methods of teaching language skills to the hearing impaired; amplification systems and their utilization; and current practices in education of the deaf.

  
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    SPA 411 - Basic Diagnostic Procedures

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 308 and 321 (or equivalent)

    The philosophy and implementation of procedures for the diagnosis and appraisal of communication disorders, with emphasis upon the administration, scoring, and interpretation of data obtained from observation and from diagnostic instruments used to evaluate language, articulation, fluency, and voice. Observation of diagnostic sessions may be required.

  
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    SPA 449 - Neurology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Students must be an upper level undergraduate or graduate student

    This course will provide information concerning the organization and function of the human nervous system. Emphasis will be given to the nervous system’s participation in human speech and communication.

  
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    SPA 500 - Research Methods in SLP

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide students with a foundation in research methods used in speech-language pathology. The evaluation of treatment evidence is emphasized.

  
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    SPA 501 - Motor Speech Disorders

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 313 or its equivalent

    This course is designed to be an overview of the motor speech disorders from a speech science application perspective. Differential diagnosis and treatment are stressed by examining the characteristics, etiology, and neurophysiologic basis for the disorders. The analysis and interpretation of data collected through instrumentation is emphasized.

  
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    SPA 502 - Language Disorders

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the characteristics, etiology, assessment, and treatment of language disorders in children and adolescents.

  
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    SPA 503 - Articulatory/Phonologic Disorders

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the current theory, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of articulatory/phonologic disorders. Developmental stages, traditional, and phonological analyses will form the basis for evaluation and diagnosis. Intervention using traditional and phonological procedures will be covered.

  
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    SPA 504 - Voice Disorders

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the vocal mechanism’s structure, function, and disorders. Methods of voice analysis and therapy will be presented.

  
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    SPA 505 - Fluency Disorders

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to provide a foundation for students to understand the disorders of fluency in children and adults from a multifactorial perspective.

  
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    SPA 506 - Audiology for Speech-Language Pathologists

    Credits: 3

    This course will focus on disorders of hearing, diagnosis of the diseases that cause them, and clinical methods for measuring hearing loss.

  
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    SPA 507 - Craniofacial Anomalies and Associated Speech Disorders

    Credits: 3

    This course will focus on the communicative disorders that are related to cranio-facial anomalies including cleft lip and palate, with emphasis on assessment and treatment of the speech disorders associated with these syndromes.

  
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    SPA 511 - Readings in Speech-Language Pathology

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to survey any current topic of importance that may not have been covered in sufficient depth in other courses. Content may vary from year to year. Examples of topics that might be covered are multicultural issues, augmentative communication, communication and crime, techniques of imaging the speech mechanism, and computer applications in diagnosis and treatment of speech disorders.

  
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    SPA 512 - Seminar in Medical Speech-Language Pathology

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to assist students in the task of relating current research, clinical practices and ethical considerations to the needs of communicatively handicapped individuals in medical settings.

  
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    SPA 513 - Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology (On Campus)

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Twenty hours of clinical observation

    The purpose of this course is to develop clinical competency skills in evaluation and therapy under the direct supervision of the SLP faculty. Assignments are based on availability.

    Note: Must be repeated three times before the student can enroll in SPA 515.

  
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    SPA 514 - Practicum in Audiology

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: SPA 303, 403, or 506

    This course provides supervised experience in audiologic diagnostics and rehabilitation.

    Note: Repeatable.

  
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    SPA 515 - Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology (Off Campus)

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Three semesters of SPA 513 and permission of the Graduate Practicum Coordinator

    The purpose of this course is to develop clinical competency skills in evaluation and therapy in off campus sites such as public schools, nursing homes, hospitals, clinics, or other appropriate facilities. Assignments are based on availability.

  
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    SPA 520 - Observation and Clinical Methods

    Credits: 1

    This course will provide students with an introduction to clinical procedures, and analyses of preparation and structure necessary for successful therapy; observation of therapy in different settings.

    Note: Pass/Fail.

  
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    SPA 521 - Communication Disorders in Infants

    Credits: 3

    This course will focus on assessment and intervention with infants and toddlers with communication disorders. Social communicative development and family-centered practice will be emphasized.

  
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    SPA 522 - Dysphagia

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: SPA 449 is strongly recommended.

    This course will provide information concerning normal and abnormal swallowing in adults and children with emphasis on diagnostic/evaluation and treatment.

  
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    SPA 525 - Language Science

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide the graduate student with knowledge of the psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic bases of language as well as an in-depth understanding of pragmatics, morphology, syntax, phonology, and semantics.

  
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    SPA 530 - Neurogenic Disorders of Communication

    Credits: 3

    Advanced study of the neuropathologic disorders of language, with emphasis upon adult aphasia. Consideration of identification, classification, associated problems or anomalies, systems of diagnosis and treatment; similarities and differences among diagnosed disorders and different treatment regimens.

    Note: SPA 449 is strongly recommended.

  
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    SPA 535 - Counseling for Communication Disorders

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Advanced graduate status, or permission of the Speech-Language Pathology Department Chair

    This course will provide information regarding counseling theories and techniques, and their direct application to speech-language therapy.

  
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    SPA 545 - Multicultural Language Difference

    Credits: 3

    This course will focus on understanding the assessment and treatment techniques for communication disorders in multicultural populations. Implications for accent reduction of non-native languages will be discussed.

  
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    SPA 555 - Language Learning Disabilities (LLD)

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an in-depth study of the relationship between language skills and classroom success. It will include identification, classification, associated problems, methods of diagnosis and treatment and service delivery.

  
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    TH 150 - Theatre Practicum

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair of Music and Theatre

    Entry level practical work in Theatre at the discretion of the Director of Theatre.

    Note: May be repeated, but no more than three (3) hours of credit total may be earned.

  
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    TH 175 - Theatre Appreciation

    Credits: 3

    An overview of the elements of theatre and kinds of drama, with hands on experience possible in different aspects of theatre.

    Note: Fulfills Fine Arts core requirement.

  
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    TH 176 - Playscript Analysis

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 175

    A study of the script as the necessary foundation for the three-dimensional theatre experience, and techniques for deriving from the script information for a performance which realizes as fully as possible and with minimal distortion, the playwright’s expressive intentions.

  
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    TH 200 - Practical Aspects of Stage Makeup

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to acquaint the student of theatre with the vital and functional relationship between make-up and art, and to demonstrate various types and styles of theatrical make-up.

  
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    TH 205 - Fundamentals of Interpretation

    Credits: 3

    A study of the fundamentals of vocal production and movement principles used by actors. Individual attention is given to the improvement of diction and voice quality.

  
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    TH 207 - Creative Dramatics

    Credits: 3

    Designed to introduce students to the use of theatrical tools (movement, imagination, improve, acting, directing, writing) as a method of teaching a variety of material to a broad range of ages. The approach of creative drama encourages the teacher to create and adapt exercises that can add an exciting element to learning for their students. The course is helpful to anyone who will be leading groups: teachers, camp counselors, and parents.

  
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    TH 209 - Seminar for Playwrights

    Credits: 3

    Students will participate in discussion of classic and contemporary play structure, complete specific writing assignments intended to exercise imagination, playwriting skills, and playwriting format, and will write a play.

  
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    TH 217 - Stage Crafts

    Credits: 3

    This course will include design, construction, painting of stage scenery, operation of stage and shop machinery.

    Note: 6 hr. per wk

  
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    TH 219 - Beginning Acting

    Credits: 3

    This course is deigned to introduce the student to the fundamental principles of acting theory, required of theatre majors, and is geared toward actor training. Beginning acting can be helpful for anyone who may be entering a field where vocal and physical performance is of importance: teachers, newscasters, lawyers, executives, and salespersons. This course includes the reading of a number of plays during the semester.

  
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    TH 250 - Theatre Practicum

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair of Music and Theatre

    Intermediate level practical work in Theatre at the discretion of the Director of Theatre.

    Note: May be repeated, but no more than six (6) hours of credit total may be earned.

  
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    TH 275 - Introduction To Design for the Theatre

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 217

    The student will learn the fundamentals of design as they apply to a theatrical production (costumes and scenery) and will be introduced to the graphic techniques necessary to communicate their ideas.

    Note: 6 hrs. per wk.

  
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    TH 301 - Theatre as a Profession

    Credits: 1

    This course is designed to help Theatre majors begin preparation for their lives after graduation whether this involves entering graduate school, or seeking employment in the professional theatre or entertainment industry.

  
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    TH 317 - Stage Crafts II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 217

    Course will include design, construction, painting of stage scenery, operation of stage and shop machinery.

    Note: 6 hrs. per wk

  
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    TH 318 - Stage Lighting

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 217

    A study of lighting equipment and its application to the theatre including instrumentation, control, color and design.

  
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    TH 319 - Intermediate Acting

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 219

    This course expands on the basic acting skills acquired in TH 219 (Beginning Acting) by requiring students to perform scenes from selected dramatic literature.

  
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    TH 320 - Directing

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 217, 219, 318, or permission of the Department Chair of Music Theatre

    Introduces the fundamentals and practical application of the principles of play direction together with supervised laboratory hours in directing projects.

  
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    TH 321 - Theatre Management

    Credits: 3

    A study of theatre organization and management including such areas as arts leadership and development, publicity and promotion, box office operations, and budgeting.

  
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    TH 360 - Internship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Theatre majors

    Student-planned work experience related to their major area of study.

  
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    TH 400 - Seminar: Special Problems In Theatre Practice

    Credits: 1-3

    Theatre production master class, focusing on technical and/or artistic demands of a play in production.

    Note: May be repeated for up to a total of 9 hrs

  
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    TH 419 - Advanced Acting

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 319

    An intense continuation of 319 with emphasis on period styles and some avant garde materials.

  
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    TH 457 - History of the Theatre I

    Credits: 3

    A survey of historical developments in the theatre from classical era to 18th Century neo-classicism.

  
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    TH 458 - History of Theatre II

    Credits: 3

    A survey of historical developments in the theatre from the 18th century to the present.

  
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    TH 464 - Costume for the Stage

    Credits: 3

    A study of the historical development and practical aspects of costumes for the theatre.

  
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    TH 475 - Advanced Design for Theatre

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: TH 275 and TH 318

    Advanced design problems in set, lights, costumes, sound, and props. The theoretical and practical aspects of the areas are emphasized.

    Note: 6 hrs. per wk

  
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    TH 476 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism

    Credits: 3

    A survey of the theoretical literature involved in play analysis as it developed from classical times to the present, as well as the skills needed to undertake critical evaluation of a play.

    Note: Requires research activity.

  
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    TH 490 - Research in Theatre

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Music and Theatre Department Chair

    Supervised independent study, the content of which will address advanced work in the areas of design, directing, or production. Sample projects may include design of sets, lights, or costumes for a main-stage production; direction of a main-stage production; execution of specific production problems, such as scene painting, fabric dyeing, welding, and draping.

  
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    TH 491 - Research in Theatre

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Music and Theatre Department Chair

    Supervised independent study, the content of which will address advanced work in the areas of design, directing, or production. Sample projects may include design of sets, lights, or costumes for a main-stage production; direction of a main-stage production; execution of specific production problems, such as scene painting, fabric dyeing, welding, and draping.

  
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    TH 492 - Research in Theatre

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Music and Theatre Department Chair

    Supervised independent study, the content of which will address advanced work in the areas of design, directing, or production. Sample projects may include design of sets, lights, or costumes for a main-stage production; direction of a main-stage production; execution of specific production problems, such as scene painting, fabric dyeing, welding, and draping.

  
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    TH 501 - Movement/Voice I

    Credits: 4

    (a) Movement: This is a foundational course designed to enable actors to develop the skills necessary for their craft. With the body as the primary tool, included will be a daily physical conditioning routine for strength, stamina and coordination. Special emphasis will be on the exploration of body articulation and rhythmic movement. This will also include an introduction to choral dance traditions that will be developed throughout the movement/dance program. (b) Voice: An essential component for the physical actor is voice. This course delineates an approach (based on Roy Hart voice work) that enables the actor to realize their potential to reach out to the extreme and varied vocal areas that physical and masked theatre demand.


  
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    TH 502 - Movement/Voice II

    Credits: 4

    (a) Movement: This is a consolidation of work achieved in Movement I, leading into more complex areas of improvisation and a development of traditional dance motifs. This course will also include an introduction to acrobatic movement as a preparation for the circus module that follows. (b) Voice: This course continues from Voice I, introducing more textual variation and investigating the “vocal design” for stylized physical performance.

  
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    TH 521 - Music I

    Credits: 1

    Combined with Voice I, the music component underlines an aspect of physical theatre that is often overlooked: the musical skills (both instrumental, rhythmic and vocal) that are essential partners in both composition and performance. Students will learn basic rhythmic patterns, along with the gradual incorporation of ensemble work. This will also include introductory work with the unique music of the Mediterranean, its melodic and rhythmic structure and its links with ritual.


  
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    TH 522 - Music II

    Credits: 1

    This course builds on the principles Music I, reinforcing confidence in music-making both as a soloist and in ensemble, with a deeper incorporation of stylistic motifs of the Mediterranean basin including an introduction to traditional instruments.


  
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    TH 531 - Aesthetics/History I

    Credits: 1

    Actors need to contextualize their art both historically and aesthetically. Gaining insights into the history of masked theatre in Italy and into its influence through to the present gives perspective on current trends.


  
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    TH 532 - Aesthetics/History II

    Credits: 1

    Students make an overview of the history of the masked actor in Italy from Plautus to the present day, coupled with an exploration of the social structures from which they evolved.


  
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    TH 533 - Circus History and Dramaturgy

    Credits: 1

    This course will be an overview of the history of circus and an analysis of its form as a performative art.


  
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    TH 541 - Italian for Actors I

    Credits: 0

    Specially designed for actors, this course introduces the student to the basics in grammar, pronunciation and comprehension essential as students enter into the local culture.


    Note: Required for non-Italian speakers.

  
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    TH 542 - Italian for Actors II

    Credits: 0

    Specially designed for actors, this course introduces the student to the basics in grammar, pronunciation and comprehension essential as students enter into the local culture.


    Note: Required for non-Italian speakers

  
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    TH 551 - Acting I

    Credits: 4

    This course establishes the foundation of the MFA in Physical Theatre. The actor is introduced to the principles underlying this form of theatre. Improvisation, spatial awareness, mime, physical memory and the use of neutral and larval masks develop the skills that define the parameters of stylized theatre forms. Essential to this course are the first steps toward ensemble formation.


  
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    TH 552 - Acting II

    Credits: 4

    Through both solo and small group improvisation and scene study, students will continue to explore elements established in Acting I. As well as leading students through a development of various stylistic forms, including clown work, story telling and mime, students will also undertake a series of scene studies in order to consolidate their compositional and imaginative skills.


  
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    TH 561 - Acrobatics/Physical Preparation

    Credits: 2

    Rigorous daily physical training is a prerequisite to safety and control for the extreme demands of circus skills. Acrobatics is studied both in static and dynamic situations.


  
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    TH 562 - Object Manipulation

    Credits: 1

    Students learn to manipulate objects including juggling balls and batons.


 

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