Dec 11, 2018  
2009-2010 Bulletin 
    
2009-2010 Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
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    CA 375 - Advanced Baking

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 300

    The theory and practice of operating a small bakery or pasty shop. Provides experience in producing French and American pastries and baked goods. Emphasis is on producing products from scratch, by hand.

  
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    CA 399 - Selected Topics in Culinary Arts

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the Director

    Selected topics courses address specific subjects or contemporary issues in culinary arts.

    Note: Course may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours.

  
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    CA 400 - Food Preparation III (with laboratory)

    Credits: 5

    Prerequisite: CA 301

    Advanced level of food preparation; emphasis on distinctive and complex food preparations; extensive menu-based meal planning and presentation.

  
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    CA 401 - World Cuisines

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 301

    Regional cuisines from throughout the world and application of cooking methods used in these cuisines including distinctive ingredients and approaches to food preparation.

  
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    CA 410 - Business Skills in the Culinary Arts

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BU 157, 160 or MA 123

    Basic business skills and business mathematics applied to the food industry.

  
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    CA 415 - Food Styling

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ART 103, 104, 220 or permission of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    Concepts and techniques for food presentation to the camera, including styling techniques; the process of preparing food for still photography and videos; selecting tools and props; choosing and treating ingredients for presentation and endurance; and bringing the plate to camera readiness; food styling problems related to photography.

    Note: Requires the development of a food styling kit.

  
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    CA 450 - International Internship

    Credits: 6-12

    Prerequisite: CA 301, 401 and recommendation of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    Supervised application of knowledge and skills in a food service program in an international setting.

  
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    CA 451 - Independent Study

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of the Director of the Culinary Arts Institute

    For culinary arts majors pursuing a minor in nutrition/wellness, the declaration of the minor is also required. Original or independent study and research in selected topics related to the field of culinary arts and the student’s career objectives.

  
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    CA 460 - Seminar in Culinary Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: All other courses in the Culinary Entrepreneurship curriculum

    Capstone course in culinary entrepreneurship. Emphasis on case analysis and the development and presentation of a comprehensive culinary business plan.

  
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    CA 490 - Gender and Culinary Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: CA 260 and BU 160 or MA 123

    Exploration of the economic and cultural contexts of gender in the culinary marketplace. Specific attention will be given to women’s roles and spheres of influence in business today, with a view towards the future of women-led culinary enterprises.

  
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    CA 492 - Service Business Operations and Strategy

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 123 or BU 160 and CA 260

    Provides the context for studying operations management in service industries. Course content organized around service economy, competition, delivery and quantitative analysis tools.

  
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    CA 499 - Selected Topics in Culinary Entrepreneurship

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: CA 200, 260 or concurrent enrollment in CA 363 and 365

    Addresses specific subjects or contemporary issues in culinary entrepreneurship.

  
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    COM 101 - Oral Communication

    Credits: 3

    Introduction to the principles and practices of basic oral communication. Modification of existing behavior and/or the addition of new skills necessary in everyday interpersonal and public communication situations.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 102 - Introduction to Mass Communication

    Credits: 3

    A survey of the mass media, including principles, practices, development, history, and place in society.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 103 - Introduction To Media Technology

    Credits: 3

    Laboratory and demonstration. Audio and video equipment operation and production techniques including an introduction to digital photography. Primary emphasis on basic television production techniques and video streaming technology.

    Note: Open to all students.

  
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    COM 200 - Writing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: EN 101 and BU 157 or higher computer-based course

    A foundation course in news gathering and writing for print and broadcast media including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, advertising, and public relations. Practical applications on radio station WMUW and campus newspaper, The Spectator.

  
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    COM 201 - Interpersonal Communication

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 101

    An analysis of the fundamentals of interpersonal communication and small group principles and practices.

  
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    COM 204 - Announcing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 101, 103

    Study, practice, and application of basic announcing techniques for radio and television.

  
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    COM 210 - Media Advertising, Management & Sales

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200 or BU 333 for business majors

    Survey of contemporary advertising’s core components from initial concepts to final advertising executions, distinguishing the diversity in marketing, promotion and public relations specialization. Theoretical approaches will include persuasive campaigns, writing platforms for all media, and discussion of legal, regulatory, social and public policy environments of modern advertising. Practical applications will be enhanced specifically through selling advertising for campus newspaper, The Spectator (print and online versions), as well as through projects including integrated computer applications.

  
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    COM 250 - Newsgathering

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 103 and COM 200

    An advanced course in newsgathering and writing for print and digital media with a particular focus on convergence-based journalism. Students will prepare news content for multiple media platforms. Students are required to prepare content for both the print and online versions of campus newspaper, The Spectator, and radio station WMUW.

  
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    COM 299 - Special Topics in Communication

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    This course allows flexibility in offering selected topics in Communications.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

  
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    COM 303 - Images of Women in Film

    Credits: 3

    An examination of how women have been depicted on celluloid in both American and international films, from the early silents to today’s liberated cinema. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to evaluate the presentation of women in these films, based within the context of the society and the era that produced individual films as well as the place of women within a traditionally male-dominated commercial business industry, and how that presentation has evolved since the early days of the cinema.

    Also listed as WS 303
  
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    COM 307 - Advanced Writing for the Media

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200

    Survey of principles and concepts regarding in-depth reporting, how to gather information from sources, how to observe and adequately parlay those observations in writing, how to verify material and how to assemble stories for several mediums, including print, broadcast, public relations, web media. Theoretical discussions regarding journalism morality, copyright issues and other media law aspects. Practical applications will focus on writing articles for The Spectator and other news sources.

  
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    COM 310 - Digital Culture

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102 and COM 200

    This course examines the development, uses, and effects of digital technology on culture.

  
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    COM 320 - Mass Communication and Society

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102 and COM 200

    Basic principles and theories of mass communication and public opinion. Open to all students.

  
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    COM 325 - Visual Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: BU 157 or higher computer-based course

    Course addresses visual literacy in both theory and practical application. Theoretical approaches to visual perception, ethical issues related to images and copyright issues are enhanced by traditional practical applications to include media print products (fliers, folders, booklets, magazines and newspapers) as well as multimedia production and editing of publications. Students will use 35mm photography, digital photography, and software applications necessary to address the visual elements of integrated design.

  
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    COM 331 - Audio Production

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 103, 200, 204

    An audio production course with emphasis on production of announcements and programs. Particular attention given to program content, aesthetics, as well as programming practices in commercial and non-commercial radio in light of competing and emerging media. Practical application on campus radio station WMUW.

  
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    COM 400 - Practicum

    Credits: 1

    Prerequisite: 12 hours in Communication and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    Practical experience will be gained through assigned work with WMUW, the university radio station, The Spectator, the campus newspaper, and other campus labs or offices such as the Public Affairs Office. This course will be repeatable for up to two hours.

  
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    COM 410 - Media Law & Ethics

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 102 and 12 hours in Communication

    This course provides students with an overview of the legal and ethical environment in which mass media operate. Aspects of freedom of speech, limitations on speech, intellectual property rights, and related topics will be covered.

  
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    COM 413 - Public Relations

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 200

    An overview of the principles and proven techniques in gaining public acceptance for a product, an occasion, a cause, or an institution along with governmental public affairs. Crises Management by the Public Relations Professional will be a recurring and important component. Attention is given to writing the publicity article, preparing brochures, planning promotion campaigns for selected subjects through various mass media and crises communication. Also included will be the Legal Environment and Ethics involved in Public Relations. Case studies of practiced techniques and application of principles and ethics of public relations.

  
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    COM 425 - Advanced Visual Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 325

    This course addresses visual literacy, project planning, and design execution in both theory and practical application with online multimedia designs. Students are introduced to advanced topics and developing issues.

  
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    COM 431 - Video Production

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 331

    A production course with emphasis on producing and directing video programs as well as the business and programming practices in competing and emerging media.

  
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    COM 454 - Problems in Mass Communication

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 12 hours in Communication and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    Independent study. Projects will be assigned to fit student needs and/or interests.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

  
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    COM 460 - Internship

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Advanced standing, 2.5 QPA overall and in major

    A practical, structured program of work experience with a participating employer. Interns must be employed a minimum of 120 hours, must be supervised by the employer and a faculty member, and must have a tangible academic component (journal, research paper, portfolio, etc.), which should be submitted at the end of the internship period.

    Note: Internship may be taken twice for a total of 6 hours.

  
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    COM 465 - Communication Senior Seminar

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: COM 250, 310, 320, and senior standing

    Capstone course in communication that includes survey of current literature, critical analysis of international communication, and examination of issues and problems of the mass media especially relevant to students’ career interests.

  
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    COM 499 - Special Topics in Communication

    Credits: 1-3

    Prerequisite: COM 200, advanced standing, and permission of the Department Chair of Communication

    This course allows flexibility in offering selected advanced topics in Communications.

    Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

  
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    ED 100 - Reading For College

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to strengthen students’ college level reading comprehension skills. Basic reading skills taught will include building vocabulary, selecting main ideas and supporting details, and recognizing relationships in college level writing. In addition, the critical reading skills of evaluating, analyzing, and interpreting written information will be taught. Finally, specific active reading strategies will also be taught.

    Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

  
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    ED 101 - Praxis Seminar (Writing)

    Credits: 0

    Praxis Seminar is designed for teacher education candidates who are having difficulty passing Praxis I. The course will meet for one hour each week and will consist of individual and small group instruction in writing and English usage.

    Note: Candidates may take the course as often as they wish.

  
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    ED 206 - Developing Critical And Creative Thinking



    This course is designed to assist education majors in developing critical and creative thinking, which are essential skills for individuals in the world and in the classroom. Students will investigate and practice various modes of thinking to include Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking, Intuitive Thinking, Analytical Thinking, and Logic. These skills will be developed by the student to enhance personal and professional decision making and to become equipped to teach these skills in the classroom.

  
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    ED 297 - The Computer and the Classroom

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of computers and of the applications of the computer in educational settings.

  
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    ED 299 - Special Topics in Education

    Credits: 1-3

    The course allows flexibility in offering selected topic courses or workshops for credit.

  
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    ED 300 - Education as a Profession

    Credits: 3

    This course seeks to involve prospective teachers in the issues of schooling and education and to give them a clear view of the skills and knowledge they will need to be successful professionals. The philosophical foundations and history of American education, governance, finance, and ethical and legal issues are discussed. Formal application for “Admission to Teacher Education” will be made during the course.

  
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    ED 302 - Art and Science of Teaching

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on preparing students to use the INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium) Core Standards as the basis for planning meaningful instruction, managing the classroom environment, and meeting needs of diverse learners. Candidates will practice selecting appropriate teaching methods, developing lesson plans, and using technology in the classroom.

    Note: 30 hour field experience required; no exemptions will be granted.

  
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    ED 304 - Principles of Early Childhood Learning

    Credits: 3

    A survey of contemporary approaches, practices, and issues in early childhood education including the background history, philosophy and theory of their origins. The basics of physical, social and cognitive development will be addressed along with the increasingly diverse student population found in today’s schools. Emphasis will also be placed on the interrelationship of home and community in the development of the young child.

    Note: ED 305, 310, 312 and 334 must be taken concurrently.

  
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    ED 305 - Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: MA 111, 112 (grade of C or above), ED 302, and admission to Teacher Education

    A survey of techniques needed in teaching arithmetical concepts and the four fundamental processes of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, as well as elementary percentage, geometry, and measurement. Experiences are provided to insure competence in teaching estimation and problem solving. Stress is given to the use of these in meaningful situations for children. Special attention is placed on the Teacher as Decision Maker in applying the Principles and Standards for School Mathematics as developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

  
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    ED 306 - Introduction to Exceptional Learners

    Credits: 3

    This course includes concepts, perspectives, and guiding principles that are basic to an understanding of human exceptionality. Individual areas of exceptionality will be explored as well as issues relative to ethnic diversity.

  
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    ED 310 - Teaching Social Studies in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, must have completed all core Social Studies courses

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to translate knowledge and data gathering processes from history and the social sciences into appropriate and meaningful social studies experiences for students.

  
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    ED 312 - Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, must have completed all core Science courses

    This course focuses on the preparation of pre-service teachers to focus on academic, personal, social, and career applications of the biological, earth, space, and physical sciencesas well as concepts in science and technology, the history and nature of science, and the inquiry process scientists use, in order to develop skills in instruction that promotes understanding and positive attitudes among students.

  
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    ED 334 - Methods for Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary and Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education, ED 302, EN 101, 300

    This course is designed to provide the methods and materials for making appropriate professional decisions in teaching reading and the language arts in grades K-8. Emphasis is placed on a literature-based approach to instruction in oral and written language, spelling, handwriting and grammar.

  
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    ED 351 - Educational Measurement

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of this course is to examine assessment techniques, test construction, test statistics, interpretation, application, and their relationship to instructional decisions. Major attention is given to the construction of classroom assessment instruments and determination of their reliability and validity. Ethical issues of assessment, assessment needs of diverse populations, and standardized testing instruments are also examined.

  
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    ED 361 - Early Literacy Instruction I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300

    The act of teaching is a reflective decision making process involving interactions with students, colleagues, parents and members of the community. This course is designed to introduce students to theory and best practices in literacy, concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development, and systematic early reading and writing instruction specific to concepts about print, phonemic awareness and phonics.

    Note: Requires 10 hours field experience.

  
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    ED 362 - Early Literacy Instruction II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in ED 302. Required of all elementary majors

    The major emphasis of this course will be concepts, materials, and teaching strategies for oral language development and early systematic reading and writing instruction specific to vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension.

  
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    ED 365 - Content Area Reading

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300

    The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to strategies for teaching reading in the content areas. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of comprehension strategies across the curriculum.

  
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    ED 366 - Reading Assessment and Intervention

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 300, 361, or ED 362, or 365

    The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with a strong knowledge base of various assessment methods and intervention strategies for teaching reading. Students will be expected to demonstrate the application of assessment methods and intervention strategies.

  
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    ED 401 - Student Teaching Seminar: Classroom Management

    Credits: 3

    The course is designed to provide training and in-depth study of management concepts and practices in elementary and secondary classrooms. Causes of student misconduct and remedial activities will be reviewed. Laboratory experiences will be designed to develop skills in management of/and interaction with students with diverse needs. Special attention will be given to delivery of instruction in specific teaching areas.

    Note: This course is restricted to current semester student teachers or to students approved by the Teacher Education Committee.

  
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    ED 406 - Observation and Directed Teaching Grades K-8

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a student teaching center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Student teachers will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Student teachers will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Student Teaching.

  
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    ED 407 - Observation and Directed Teaching Grades K-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a student teaching center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Student teachers will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Student teachers will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Student Teaching.

  
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    ED 409 - Observation and Directed Teaching in Secondary Education Grades 7-12

    Credits: 9

    The course provides actual teaching experience in a student teaching center under the direction of qualified classroom teachers and university supervisors. Observation and other field experience precede actual classroom teaching. Individual conferences are held by both the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. The course is scheduled for five days each week during the Professional Semester. The last day of the Professional Semester is devoted to seminars under the direction of university supervisors, for the purpose of identifying and reinforcing points where additional information and study are needed. Student teachers will be on duty each day for the same hours required of their cooperating teacher(s). Student teachers will normally follow the calendar of the school system in which practice work is done.

    Note: Full time during the Professional Semester according to the schedule of the school to which each student is assigned. To enroll in these courses, students must be officially admitted to Student Teaching.

  
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    ED 498 - Instructional Technology

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 497 or a computer course

    This course will focus on fundamental concepts and skills for applying instructional technologies to educational settings and for making decisions regarding the most appropriate use. The instructional technologies include authoring/development software, multimedia computers, electronic presentation/projection systems, Internet access, and TV/VCR applications. This course is elective for education majors and recommended for graduate students.

  
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    ED 499 - Special Topics In Education

    Credits: 1-6

    Students must be admitted to Graduate Studies to enroll in courses numbered 500 or above.

    Note: (Undergraduate) This course will be used to address major topics and issues of interest and need in the field of education. Extended studies will be conducted in professional development areas affecting the role of school in society.

  
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    ED 500 - Educational Research

    Credits: 3

    This course offers instruction in the basic skills of analyzing educational research, understanding various research designs, and conducting an action research study.

  
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    ED 502 - Special Problems

    Credits: 3

    This course meets State Department of Education requirements for renewal of certificates that have been expired for more than 5 years.

  
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    ED 503 - Instructional Technology

    Credits: 3

    This course will focus on fundamental concepts and skills for applying instructional technologies to educational settings and for making decisions regarding the most appropriate use. The instructional technologies include authoring/development software, multimedia computers, electronic presentation/projection systems, Internet access, and TV/VCR applications. This course is an elective for education majors and recommended for graduate students.

  
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    ED 514 - The Professional Role of Educators

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the need for educators to serve as positive change agents as they strengthen schools from within. Students will enhance their own professional development by examining their roles as leaders, scholars, researchers, student advocates, and parent/community liaisons

  
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    ED 515 - Literature for the Adolescent

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the needs of the adolescent reader in upper elementary grades through high school. The history of young adult literature is surveyed, and the rationale for the use of this genre with adolescent students is provided. Curriculum strategies for using young adult literature in the classroom for middle school students are identified.

  
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    ED 516 - Understanding Gifted Populations

    Credits: 3

    This course includes study, research and analysis of psychological characteristics, identification procedures, assessment procedures, and learning modes of gifted populations. (Required for certification to teach gifted children in grades K-12; required course in graduate program in gifted studies).

  
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    ED 517 - Methods, Materials and Resources for Teaching the Gifted

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 516

    This course is a study of program materials, curricula models and methodologies applicable to the teaching of the gifted. (Required for certification to teach gifted children in grades K-12; required course in graduate program in gifted studies).

  
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    ED 520 - Foundations of Education

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the historical and philosophical foundations of education as well as the social forces impacting schools in modern times. Using both a chronological and a topical frame-of-reference, the students will analyze American educational leaders, trends, and movements in their general political, social, intellectual, and economic contexts.

  
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    ED 523 - Early Reading Literacy Development (Pre-K-3)

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to address essential skills and concepts for beginning literacy development. Language development, phonemic awareness, phonics, comprehension, fluency, and motivation will be incorporated from a comprehensive reading perspective.

  
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    ED 524 - Expanding Reading Literacy Development (Grades 4-12)

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to encompass reading/literacy instruction from fourth through twelfth grades. Decoding, comprehension, fluency, attitudes, motivation, and engagement will be addressed. Issues and trends in expanding reading will be researched and classroom programs will be investigated.

  
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    ED 527 - Content Area Literacy

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to address content area in all grade levels through an integrated approach to literacy.

  
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    ED 530 - Counseling the Gifted Student

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 516

    This course examines the nature of giftedness, the counseling process, and strategies specifically developed for counseling the gifted student.

  
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    ED 531 - Capstone: Effective Reading Literacy Programs

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 18 hours in literacy be completed prior to this course

    Effective Reading Programs is the capstone course for the Master of Education in Reading/Literacy program. This course has two primary goals: 1) to develop a clear understanding of what constitutes balanced reading/literacy instruction across the developmental continuum and 2) to consider what can be done to improve reading/literacy achievement in our schools. The first goal will focus on what is known about the development of effective reading/literacy programs from the literature. The second goal will include the study of effective reading/literacy programs through an examination of the school and the classroom. Case studies on school change will be studied and participants will consider how schools/districts can improve their reading instruction.

  
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    ED 532 - Children’s Literature in the Elementary Classroom (Pre-K-6)

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to offer a survey of current and classic children’s literature with an emphasis on multicultural literature in grades Pre-K-6. Issues and trends in children’s literature will be researched and evaluations of quality literature across genres will be conducted.

  
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    ED 534 - Process Writing

    Credits: 3

    This course will address instructional strategies to develop and implement a process writing program for the classroom. The focus will be on instruction and performance assessment designed to take pieces of writing through the stages of the editing process (pre-writing), during writing (draft), conferencing, after writing (final copy), and publishing.

  
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    ED 538 - Understanding Individual Learning Differences

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the use of learning theories to understand the needs of diverse learners and to create responsive learning environments.

  
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    ED 548 - Methods and Materials for Teaching Diverse Learners

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 538

    This course is designed to provide the student with educational strategies and resources that can be used effectively with diverse learners.

  
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    ED 549 - Instructional Assessment Practices and Procedures

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 538/548

    This course provides professionals with skills in the application of assessment practices and procedures necessary for decision-making in planning and differentiating instruction.

  
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    ED 551 - Managing the Instructional Environment

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 538/548

    This course focuses on the structure of the instructional environment and its relevance of the learner’s motivation, development, and behavior.

  
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    ED 552 - Curriculum Development

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 517 (Gifted) or ED 548 (MAT, DI)

    This course is a study of the theoretical bases and practical applications for curriculum work. Special attention will be given to specific procedures to follow and concepts to consider in creating curriculum experiences.

  
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    ED 554 - Collaboration

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 538/548

    This course is designed to prepare professionals for the role of co-teacher, collaborator, and consultant

  
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    ED 560 - Independent Study in Education

    Credits: 1-6

    Course taught at irregular intervals or upon demand of at least 6 students; course developed to meet special needs, times or current relevant topics in the education area.

    On demand
  
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    ED 564 - Effective Literacy Assessment and Intervention

    Credits: 3

    The focus of this course is the role of the teacher as a diagnostician in the classroom. Students will learn how to administer measures of literacy assessments that can be used for individuals or whole groups. Students will analyze data and plan appropriate interventions. Students will examine clinical and classroom diagnostic methods, explore the theoretical foundations for these practices, and discuss practical applications.

  
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    ED 566 - Internship in MAT

    Credits: 3

    This course is the clinical supervision of the MAT program. Intern teachers will meet regularly with their university supervisor to reflect upon instructional planning, classroom experiences, problems, and decisions they have made as classroom teachers. Students will maintain a reflective journal on the teaching experience.

  
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    ED 592 - Capstone in Differentiated Instruction

    Credits: 3

    This special topics course focuses on trends and issues characteristic of subject areas in the elementary school curriculum; emphasis is on educational reform designed to enhance student learning.

  
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    ED 594 - Atypical Populations of the Gifted

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 516

    This course is an in-depth study of the unique needs and special motivational problems of a variety of atypical populations of gifted students. Attention will be directed to the culturally diverse gifted, economically disadvantaged gifted, underachieving gifted, gifted handicapped, gifted females, the highly gifted, and gifted preschoolers.

  
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    ED 595 - Program Development and Evaluation

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 516

    This course is a study of various alternative settings, program options and models for gifted students. Procedures for systematic and comprehensive program development and evaluation will be examined. Other key issues faced by administrators or teachers of gifted programs will be addressed, such as program articulation, building support systems, and funding sources.

  
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    ED 596 - Capstone: Trends and Issues in Gifted Studies

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Minimum of 12 hours of graduate courses in gifted studies including ED 516, 517

    This course is a study of the expanding dimensions of gifted education to include new directions for identification and programming and the implications of new paradigms for research and practice.

    Note: This course is considered a “capstone” for the gifted program.

  
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    ED 598 - Internship in Education

    Credits: 3

    This course is the provision of practical training in various education centers which meet the needs/specifications of the individual graduate student under the supervision of a faculty member.

  
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    ED 599 - Internship in Reading Literacy

    Credits: 3

    This course provides the student with a 40 hour clinical experience in a supervised setting. Interns administer diagnostic assessment and implement instruction based on the results.

    Note: This internship is designed to be the final course of the series.

  
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    ED 620 - Leadership Principles

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce leadership theory and provide an overview of change theory and systems theory. Current educational leadership theories and practices will be explored.

  
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    ED 630 - Leadership through Instructional Supervision

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 620

    This course will focuses on an understanding of instruction and how to effectively supervise, guide, and develop appropriate instructional practice. Cognitive coaching, clinical supervision, and evaluation of teachers will be covered.

  
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    ED 640 - Leadership through School Management

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 620

    This course will examine organizational effectiveness strategies for managing all aspects of the educational environment to create a safe and orderly school climate. The following will be covered: school safety, financial management and budgeting, personnel, physical facilities, and scheduling.

  
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    ED 652 - Leadership of Curriculum Design

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 620

    This course for leadership students focuses on best practices in the processes of guiding and evaluating the development and alignment of curriculum. Students will gain practice in utilizing data to inform curriculum decision making and will also gain an understanding of how to evaluate curriculum design for appropriateness for the various grade levels and subject areas.

  
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    ED 670 - Leadership: Political, Cultural, and Legal Implications

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: ED 620

    This course will examine the political, cultural, and legal context of school leadership. Students will gain practice in making appropriate and legal decisions while working with all stakeholders.

  
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    ED 680 - Leadership Practice with Ethics and Integrity

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Must be within the last six (6) hours of the Master’s of Education degree in Educational Leadership

    In this capstone course, students will explore leadership practice emphasizing integrity and ethical decision making. Students will be required to develop a capstone portfolio demonstrating developed skills in leadership and ethical practice.

  
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    ED 692 - Leadership Internship: Elementary Schools

    Credits: 3

    School based internship, emphasizing the elementary school. Students will complete structured hands-on assignments.

  
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    ED 694 - Leadership Internship: Middle Schools

    Credits: 3

    School based internship, emphasizing the middle school. Students will complete structured hands-on assignments.

  
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    ED 696 - Leadership Internship: High Schools

    Credits: 3

    School based internship, emphasizing the high school. Students will complete structured hands-on assignments.

  
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    ED 698 - Leadership Internship: District Level

    Credits: 3

    School based internship, emphasizing district level responsibilities such as budgeting, personnel, transportation, special education, school lunch program, federal programs, and professional development. Students will complete structured hands-on assignments.

 

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