Nov 16, 2018  
2009-2010 Bulletin 
    
2009-2010 Bulletin [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    FLS 332 - The Drama of the Golden Age

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    A study of the important dramatic authors of the Golden Age-Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Juan Ruiz de Alarcon, and Calderon de la Barc-and of other representative writers.

  
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    FLS 333 - Cervantes

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Cervantes and his age, with special study of the Quijote and of the Novelas Ejemplares.

  
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    FLS 352 - The Nineteenth-Century Regional Novel

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Development of the novel of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as it interprets the life of Spain. Intensive study of representative regional novels.

  
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    FLS 361 - Contemporary Spanish Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    A survey of Spanish Literature of the twentieth century. The first semester includes the work of those writers designated as the “Generation of ‘98”; the second semester is a study of the “Generation of ‘27” and representative post-Civil War writers.

  
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    FLS 362 - Contemporary Spanish Literature

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    A survey of Spanish Literature of the twentieth century. The first semester includes the work of those writers designated as the “Generation of ‘98”; the second semester is a study of the “Generation of ‘27” and representative post-Civil War writers.

  
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    FLS 381 - Spanish-American Literature I

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of Spanish-American literature from colonialism to Modernismo.

  
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    FLS 382 - Spanish-American Literature II

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FLS 202 or 252 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    A study in chronological order of selected works representative of different periods of Spanish-American literature from Modernismo to modern times.

  
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    FLS 388 - Literature of the Native Peoples of America

    Credits: 3

    A study of the literature and culture of the native peoples of the Americas. The first half covers the time prior to the arrival of the Spaniards to the seventeenth century. The second half covers the period from the eighteenth century to the present.

  
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    FLS 389 - Literature of the Native Peoples of America

    Credits: 3

    A study of the literature and culture of the native peoples of the Americas. The first half covers the time prior to the arrival of the Spaniards to the seventeenth century. The second half covers the period from the eighteenth century to the present.

  
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    FLS 398 - Special Topics

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Completion of FLS 202 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Special topics in Spanish culture and Spanish language theory

  
  •  

    FLS 399 - Special Topics

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Completion of FLS 202 or permission of the Department Chair of Languages, Literature and Philosophy

    Special topics in Spanish literature.

  
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    FN 225 - Nutrition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 8 hours of science

    Nutrients and their effect on and utilization by the human body from prenatal development through the elderly years.

  
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    FN 226 - Nutrition for Culinary Professionals

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: 8 hours of science

    Nutrients, their utilization by the human body and their role in chronic disease prevention.

  
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    FN 247 - Nutrition and Physical Activity in Weight Management

    Credits: 3

    Introduction to the practice of weight management based on sound principles of nutrition and physical activity.

    HKC 247
  
  •  

    FN 301 - Science of Food

    Credits: 3

    Chemical reactions in cooking; explanation and application of the relation and nature of specific food components and their behavior during food preparation.

  
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    FN 302 - Menu/Recipe Development

    Credits: 3

    The development of recipes and menus for application to food service test kitchen settings.

  
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    FN 484 - Nutrition in Disease

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FN 325

    Nutritional care of the hospitalized patient; theoretical basis for qualitative and quantitative modifications of the usual eating pattern to meet metabolic, pathological, and psychological needs of patient.

  
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    FN 499 - Selected Topics in Nutrition

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Senior or graduate status, FN 325 or equivalent

    Selected topics will address specific subjects or contemporary topics in the area of nutrition.

    Note: Course may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 9 credit hours.

  
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    FPA 299 - Special Topics in Fine Arts

    Credits: 1-3

  
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    FPA 300 - Fine Arts in Education

    Credits: 3

    A consideration of the rationale for including Fine Arts as part of the K-8 academic curriculum. A basic history of art, music, theatre, and dance, and fundamental principles, techniques, and materials for teaching these various components of the Fine Arts to children.

  
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    FPA 399 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1-3

    Special topics related to the arts, disciplines of art, music, and theatre.

  
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    FPA 499 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1-3

    Special topics related to the arts, disciplines of art, music, and theatre.

  
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    FS 203 - Professional Issues

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Family Studies program with an overall GPA of at least 2.0

    This course provides the student with information about the foundations of the discipline, including history and mission; discusses the role of professionals in meeting the needs of individuals and families; introduces students to professional standards, ethics, and career opportunities in the field; and presents the current status of family studies and related disciplines.

  
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    FS 225 - Management of Family Resources

    Credits: 3

    Focuses on the practical application of management principles for use of all resources to maximize individual and family satisfactions.

  
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    FS 290 - Introduction of Research in Family Studies

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201, FS 203 with minimum grade of C

    Prepares students to perform basic research skills, including locating and summarizing published research in family studies.

  
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    FS 299 - Special Topics

    Credits: 1-6

    This course will address contemporary issues in the area of family studies.

  
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    FS 306 - Marriage and the Family

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201

    The purpose of this course is to study martial family interactions with emphasis on interpersonal dynamics and developmental tasks over the family life cycle. The course includes the study of sex role development, mate selection, adjustments within interpersonal relationships, communication in the family, parent-child relations, familial responses to stress, and family violence.

    Also listed as SOC 305
  
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    FS 328 - Adolescent Development

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 206 with minimum grade of C

    This course focuses on the application of theory and research to the understanding of adolescent development. Special attention is given to the transactional nature of adolescent and family development within a social context.

    Also listed as PSY 328
  
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    FS 330 - Human Sexuality and Socialization

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 with minimum grade of C

    This course examines the physiological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexuality and interaction throughout the lifespan.

  
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    FS 382 - Theories in Family Studies

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201, FS 306/SOC 305 with minimum grade of C

    This course will review the selected theories in family studies and familiarize students with the basic principles of major conceptual frameworks. This course also focuses on fluency in applying the major theories in family studies to various research and everyday family life situations.

  
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    FS 401 - Families and Public Policy

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: FS 306/SOC 305 and PSY 201 with a minimum grade of C

    This course will address the needs of families through public policy. It will focus on the legislative process, implementation of law, as well as current and pending legislation in local, state and national government policies that directly effect families.

  
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    FS 421 - Adult Development

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201 and 206 with a minimum grade of C

    Examination of the multi-dimensional aspects of adult life from early young-adulthood through middle age; including family life and alternate lifestyles, and the transitions to parenting, empty-nest, mid-life, and retirement. Educational needs of adults and program planning are included.

  
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    FS 430 - Basic Counseling Skills

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201, 408 Interactive lecture-lab

    This course introduces the student to an eclectic model for counseling and psychotherapy with an emphasis on developing the basic interpersonal skills necessary to be successful in a professional helping field.

    Also listed as PSY 430
  
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    FS 465 - Program Planning and Evaluation

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 455 with a minimum grade of C

    This course is designed to introduce students to the process of creating life-skill programs for individuals and families. It will cover the principles of educational programming for non-academic settings in human service agencies and provide training in grant writing and program evaluation.

  
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    FS 468 - Parenting in Contemporary Society

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: PSY 201, PSY 206, FS 290, FS 306/SOC 305 with a minimum grade of C

    This course focuses on parenting issues from cross-cultural, historical, developmental, and ecological perspectives. Issues are specifically relevant to parenting children at different developmental stages, parenting in diverse ethnic groups, single-parent families, stepfamilies, dual-career families, and gay/lesbian and abusive parents.

  
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    FS 470 - Health, Drugs and Chemical Dependencies

    Credits: 3

    This courses assesses the implications of drug use on human health with a focus on drug actions and interactions, motivational factors that influence the use of drugs, and long-term societal effects of drug use.

  
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    FS 495 - Independent Study in Family Studies

    Credits: 1-3

    Must be arranged with the Family Studies coordinator. Students may choose a topic specific to personal interest or career objective.

  
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    FS 498 - Special Topic in Family Studies

    Credits: 1-6

    This course allows for flexibility in the offerings of coursework for students who are interested in topics beyond curriculum in the major.

  
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    FS 499 - Field Experience in Family Studies Occupations

    Credits: 6

    Prerequisite: FS 468. The student must have completed all academic courses required in the Family Studies major with a minimum GPA of 2.5 or better and not more than one repeated class and at least a grade of C or higher in all courses required in the major. The permission of the FS Field Experience Coordinator is also required and is obtained in cooperation with the student’s advisor.

    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with real-world experience in a selected setting and to establish professional-level relationships in the field of Human Services.

    Note: This course requires the student to complete 280 hours of supervised field experience at approved locations.

  
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    FS 570 - Health, Drugs, and Chemical Dependencies

    Credits: 3

    This course assesses the implications of drug use on human health with a focus on drug actions and interactions, motivational factors that influence the use of drugs, and long-term societal effects of drug use.

    Note: The course will be available for elective credit to students in the graduate program in Health Education.

  
  •  

    GEO 101 - Elements of World Geography

    Credits: 3

    An introductory course dealing with the fundamentals of the Earth’s surface, including both physical and cultural factors. Landforms, climate, and vegetation, as well as world regional population and cultures, are examined.

  
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    GEO 302 - Geography of North America

    Credits: 3

    A regional treatment of the continent and the natural regions forming the basis for subdivisions. Political, cultural and economic factors in relation to geography are examined.

  
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    GEO 304 - Geography of Latin America

    Credits: 3

    A physical and cultural study of Latin America. Physical environments, climates, culture, urbanization, and land-use patterns are examined.

  
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    GEO 306 - Geography of the Muslim World

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of the Department Chair of History, Political Science, and Geography.

    A regional treatment of those areas of North Africa and Asia in which Islam is the predominant religion. Political, cultural, and economic factors in relation to geography are examined.

  
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    GEO 351 - Environmental Geography

    Credits: 3

    A study of the relationship between humans and their environment. Major topics include ecosystems, natural resources, the effects of human activities on the environment and how humans can affect their responses within the confines of natural laws and culture.

    Note: Recommended for primary and secondary education social studies majors.

  
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    GEO 399 - Special Topics in Geography

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: GEO 101 recommended or permission of the Department Chair of History, Political Science, and Geography

    This course will be used for upper level seminars. It will address contemporary issues in geography. The content will vary each time the course is offered.

  
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    GS 400 - General Studies Seminar

    Credits: 2

    Prerequisite: General Studies major and permission of the general studies coordinator.

    This course is designed to help students begin preparation for their lives after graduation, whether they enter the workplace immediately or move on to graduate or professional schools. Topics will include letters of application, interviews, developing a placement file, legal aspects of being a working professional, and career options. Students are required to compile a portfolio of work (papers, projects, etc.) documenting knowledge and skills acquired through their General Studies academic program. This course is intended to be taken during the final regular term of attendance in the program of study.

  
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    HIS 101 - History of Civilization

    Credits: 3

    Social, cultural, political, intellectual, and other developments to ca. 1600; emphasis on the West.

  
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    HIS 102 - History of Civilization

    Credits: 3

    Social, cultural, political, intellectual, and other developments ca. 1600 to the present; emphasis on the West.

  
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    HIS 109 - History of the United States I

    Credits: 3

    An introductory survey of American history from the colonial era to 1876. It explores the political, social, cultural, and economic development of American society from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction. Special emphasis is given to the Revolutionary period, the establishment of American political institutions, the causes of the Civil War, and the impact of Reconstruction.

  
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    HIS 110 - History of the United States II

    Credits: 3

    An introductory survey of American history since Reconstruction. It explores the political, social, cultural, and economic forces at work in creating modern America. Special attention is given to Americans’ experience in war, civil rights for African-Americans, and the changing status of women.

  
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    HIS 311 - Introduction to Historical Thinking and Research

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the techniques of historical methodology, and to some of the major literature.

    Fall semester
  
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    HIS 312 - Mississippi History

    Credits: 3

    An introductory survey of Mississippi history from native American society to the present. It examines the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that have gone into shaping modern Mississippi and considers how Mississippi reflects the influences of a distinctive southern regional culture and a broader American culture.

  
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    HIS 320 - The Graeco-Roman World

    Credits: 3

    A survey of Greek civilization through the Hellenistic Age, with emphasis on art, literature, philosophy, social aspects; Roman civilization is treated from its origins to the third century A.D., emphasizing political institutions, economics and social developments.

  
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    HIS 324 - Women in European History: From Antiquity to the Age of the French Revolution

    Credits: 3

    The history of women and gender in European history from ancient Greece to ca. 1800.

    Also listed as WS 324
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the HIS section of this course.

  
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    HIS 326 - Women in American History

    Credits: 3

    Survey of the experiences of women in America from the seventeenth-century colonial settlements to the present, focusing on changes in the conceptions of womanhood and in the realities of women’s lives and work. Women’s participation in the social, economic, political, and cultural spheres will be studied in terms of the lives of ordinary women as well as of prominent individuals. Topics explored will include women’s domestic and wage work, marital patterns, the concept of sisterhood, the institutions of marriage and the family, legal rights, education, social and political movements.

    Also listed as WS 326
    Note: Courses with a WS prefix cannot be used toward an area of concentration or a secondary certification area. Students wanting to use this course toward their certification area must enroll in the HIS section of this course.

  
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    HIS 328 - Rise of Christianity and the Fall of Rome 200-1000

    Credits: 3

    Survey of the period from the early third through the tenth century including the rise of Christianity. Emphasis on social, political, religious, and economic continuity and change between classical Graeco-Roman civilization and the Germanic and Byzantine successor states.

  
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    HIS 329 - High and Late Medieval Europe

    Credits: 3

    The role of economic and demographic expansion in creating or transforming medieval institutions and development (1000-1300). The response of high-medieval civilization to the economic and demographic collapse of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries (1300-1500).

  
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    HIS 335 - Early Modern Europe

    Credits: 3

    A study of the political, social, intellectual, and religious history of Europe in the period 1500-1750; the decline of medieval institutions; the growth of Northern Humanism; Protestant and Catholic Reformations; religious wars; the centralization of government; the scientific revolution.

  
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    HIS 345 - Europe 1750-1914

    Credits: 3

    A study of the major events and developments in Europe from 1750 through 1914, with particular emphasis on the French revolution, industrialization, the rise of nationalism, and the revolutions of 1848.

  
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    HIS 350 - Europe Since 1914

    Credits: 3

    Major developments in Europe from World War I to the present day, with particular emphasis on the rise of Hitler and the Third Reich, the Cold War, and European Union.

  
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    HIS 351 - European Colonies in North America

    Credits: 3

    The story of the formation of the Spanish, French, and British colonies in North America. Emphasis is on development in southern North America, the Gulf Coast, the Caribbean, and the West Coast.

  
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    HIS 352 - American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1829

    Credits: 3

    Causes of the Revolution; the antagonists compared; emergence of sentiment for independence, reasons for American success; struggle for a stable government; rise of political parties; War of 1812; controversies over tariff, bank, and internal improvements; John Marshall, Monroe Doctrine.

  
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    HIS 358 - The Latin America Republics

    Credits: 3

    A survey of the political, economic, and cultural developments of the Latin American states since 1808, with special emphasis on Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Special attention is also devoted to the contemporary problems of modern Latin America.

  
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    HIS 360 - US 1829-1860 Jacksonianism, Nationalism, Sectionalism

    Credits: 3

    Westward expansion; the age of Jackson; the bank, sections, and slavery, expansion and conflict; mounting clashes between the sections.

  
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    HIS 361 - Civil War and Reconstruction

    Credits: 3

    A study of the social, economic, and political development of American society from the antebellum era through Reconstruction, emphasizing those features that led to the Civil War, the impact of the war on northern and southern society, and the political and social impact of Reconstruction.

  
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    HIS 363 - US 1876-1920 from the Gilded Age to the Progressive Era

    Credits: 3

    The growth of business and industry; settlement of the Great Plains and agrarian progressive era and the politics of reform. The First World War.

  
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    HIS 365 - America Since 1940

    Credits: 3

    A study of the progress of America from 1940, focusing on the impact of World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War on American society. It emphasizes an understanding of various movements of social change, such as civil rights, women’s movement, student protests, and gay liberation.

  
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    HIS 371 - Movies and American Society

    Credits: 3

    Popular movies are one of the most important forms of American mass culture in the twentieth century. In this course, we will explore the use of popular movies both as cultural artifacts (evidence) as well as a way of telling history. Thus we will learn to evaluate fictional movies for what they tell us about the era in which they were made and to appreciate the problems with the contributions of docudramas and documentaries to telling and interpreting the past.

  
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    HIS 372 - African-American Experience in US Society

    Credits: 3

    A general survey of the experience of African-Americans from colonial times to the present, with special emphasis on the topics of slavery, racism, black identity, the civil rights movement, and the role of African-Americans in the development of American society.

  
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    HIS 401 - Internship

    Credits: 3-6

    Prerequisite: Advanced standing and the permission of the Department Chair of History, Political Science, and Geography

    Qualified students may earn credit for participating in a program approved in advance by the faculty advisor and division.

    Note: The nature of the internship and the number of hours to be worked will determine the number of credit hours. A minimum of 120 hours is required for 3 hours credit. Three hours may be applied toward the major. Remaining hours will count as elective credit toward graduation.

  
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    HIS 405 - History of Religion in America

    Credits: 3

    A study of the relationship between religion(s) and various communities over the course of American history. The goal will be to try to understand the role that religion has played in shaping a community’s identity and understanding its place in the world and how that role has changed over time. The course will also examine the way in which religion has been shaped by society.

  
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    HIS 410 - Methods and Materials in Secondary History and Social Studies

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education

    Required of students seeking teacher certification in social studies at the secondary level, with emphasis on the place of the social studies in secondary education; selection and analysis of aims and objectives; use of special techniques and methods; appraisal of techniques.

    Note: This course does not fulfill the history requirement for the Social Sciences or History majors, but only the professional certification requirement.

  
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    HIS 412 - The History of Industry and Technology

    Credits: 3

    The origins of important scientific ideas from the ancient world to the modern age. Examines major issues in the global development of industry and technology. Emphasis is placed on analyzing technological and scientific change (including automation, the PC, biotechnology, and the internet) and its impact on societies.

  
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    HIS 415 - History of England from the Norman Conquest to the Reformation

    Credits: 3

    Political, social, and cultural aspects of English history from the Norman Conquest to the beginning of the English Reformation, 1066-1529.

  
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    HIS 416 - Britain in the Modern Era

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: HIS 102

    This course focuses on the history of Great Britain from about 1870 to the present. The course examines the decline of Britain as a significant world power through a study of industry, economics, empire, and world strategic role.

  
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    HIS 418 - Germany from Unification to Reunification

    Credits: 3

    Major developments in German history from the unification of the country to the reunification of West and East Germany. Includes a focus on German participation in World War I, the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party, World War II, the Holocaust, and German post-war economic progress.

  
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    HIS 422 - The Rise and Fall of Communism: A Global Study

    Credits: 3

    Provides a global study of socialism and communism in the modern era. Traces the rise of socialism in the late 18th and 19th centuries to the fall of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. In doing so the course adopts a global approach, examining the European roots of communism, the Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, China, Vietnam, and communist movements in Latin America. Also analyzes the Cold War in a global context.

  
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    HIS 428 - Modern Eastern Europe

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: HIS 102

    The course examines the countries of eastern Europe in the modern era with a focus on the 20th century. Emphasis will be on Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and the Baltic nations from World War I through the decline of communism and the Soviet Union.

  
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    HIS 441 - American Social History

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: HIS 209,210 or permission of the Department Chair of History, Political Science, and Geography

    A study of the themes of race, class, gender, and ethnicity in American history, particularly considering the process of how American society has accommodated or thwarted the dreams of African Americans, laborers, women, and immigrants. Students will consider how these groups developed a common consciousness and organized to overcome social and political disabilities and how this process has worked in specific communities during different eras.

  
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    HIS 454 - History of the South

    Credits: 3

    The political, social, and economic factors involved in the change from a nationally oriented to a sectionally oriented South by 1860. The impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on the post-bellum history of the South. Turmoil and change in the twentieth century.

  
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    HIS 463 - Archives Management

    Credits: 3

    A survey of the major criteria, functions, and techniques of archival management.

  
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    HIS 464 - Internship in Archives Management

    Credits: 3

    A laboratory situation, in which the student performs all the principal functions of the archivist, using actual historical documents.

  
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    HIS 465 - The World Wars and the Holocaust

    Credits: 3

    An in depth analysis of World War I and II. Includes an examination of Fascism in Italy under Mussolini and in Germany under Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust, WW II Japanese war aims and the Pacific theater, World War II in Africa, and the Nuremburg War Crimes Trials.

  
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    HIS 498 - Special Topics

    Credits: 3-6

    Note: May be taken for credit twice, so long as total credit does not exceed 6 hours.

  
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    HIS 499 - History Capstone

    Credits: 3

    Prerequisite: Completion of HIS 311 or POL 350

    A study of the use and abuse of history and historical evidence in a broad perspective, using material which majors have produced in their past coursework, as represented by portfolios of the work. Comparative history will also be examined.

    Note: Cannot be taken concurrently with HIS 311 or POL 350.

  
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    HK 101 - Beginning Swimming

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Fundamental strokes which include elementary back stroke, front crawl and side stroke; additional skills as sculling, treading water, floating, diving and basic water safety measures. Course is designed for non-swimmers.

  
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    HK 115 - Dance Survey

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    The study and practice of three forms of dance. Included are the American forms of square, round and long-way dances, and folk dances of various countries; the influence of customs of the people on the dance. Current fad dances are also introduced.

  
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    HK 123 - Badminton-Archery

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    One-half of the semester is devoted to instruction in badminton, including fundamental strokes, rules, tactics for singles and doubles play. One-half of the semester is spent in instruction in archery, including fundamental techniques and target shooting.

  
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    HK 127 - Beginning Golf

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction in fundamental use of the various clubs. Rules and etiquette are included.

    Note: Course Fee Required.

  
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    HK 129 - Beginning Fencing

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction in techniques, footwork and bouting; experience in officiating bouts.

  
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    HK 131 - Beginning Tennis

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Introduction to fundamental strokes, footwork, playing techniques, rules and etiquette.

  
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    HK 133 - Basketball/Softball

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction and practice in fundamental skills, rules and team play.

  
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    HK 134 - Volleyball/Soccer

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction and practice in fundamental skills, rules and team play.

  
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    HK 142 - Beginning Racquetball

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction in fundamental strokes, tactics, and rules.

  
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    HK 145 - Bowling

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction and practice in fundamental skills with emphasis on spot bowling as recommended by National Bowling Congress.

    Note: Fee required.

  
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    HK 149 - Recreational Sports

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Instruction in fundamental skills, rules and strategy of recreational type of sports: pickleball, table tennis, billiards, shuffleboard, horseshoes, floor tennis, and paddle tennis.

  
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    HK 171 - Personal Defense for Women

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Designed to teach the skills and knowledge essential to defending oneself against an aggressor, avoiding potentially dangerous situations and preventing physical attacks.

  
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    HK 201 - Intermediate Swimming

    Credits: 1

    (2.5 contact hours per week for a semester.)

    Prerequisite: HK 101 or its equivalent

    Strokes include front crawl, back crawl, side stroke, elementary back, and breast stroke; diving and surface diving. Emphasis is placed on skill in distance swimming.

  
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    HK 205 - Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education

    Credits: 3

    Study of measurement and evaluation procedures; application of statistical procedures; use of tests in school program; selection of tests for evaluating motor ability, sports skills, physical fitness, knowledge and the affective domain. Measurement and evaluation of fitness programs in non-school settings is included.

 

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